search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RIDEWELL


Getting there: My fi rst experience transporting my motorcycle


By Marven Ewen #150506


I OCCASIONALLY see motorcycles on back of pickup trucks and wonder why anyone would do that. Is there something wrong with the bike? Is it


newly purchased? It always seemed to me like “real” motorcyclists ride. Well, this year I found myself doing the unthinkable. I carried my bike on my pickup from Minnesota to south- ern Ontario. I have made the trip many times


on my bike. I have relatives in Ontario and love to ride the back roads there. This time we were trav- eling there in order to attend a wed- ding. My wife is also a rider, but really doesn’t care to spend entire days traveling by motorcycle. We would definitely have to go by car, which would rob me of the opportu- nity to do some riding while there. I considered riding my bike while she drove the car, but that just didn’t seem right. A plan started to formu- late in my mind: why not put the bike on my pickup and take it with us? With no experience, I started


doing some research. Would my bike even fit in the truck bed? After some careful measurements, I realized the bike would fit but I would have to leave the tailgate down. Next, I started looking at ramps. Thirty years ago I had the terrifying but suc- cessful experience of riding a motor- cycle up a long, 18-inch wide ramp onto the back of a home mover truck. More aware of my mortality these days, I decided I wanted the widest ramp possible. I settled on a 48-inch


72 BMW OWNERS NEWS October 2017


wide ramp that actually breaks down into three foldable pieces to stow beside the bike and ordered it from Discountramps.com. I went to the local motorcycle shop and


bought some friction style tie-downs. I have tried ratcheting tie downs in the past on other projects, but never got the hang of them. At some point I always end up losing


in my truck bed, I attached the chock to a piece of three-quarter inch plywood sheet that I cut to seven feet. It was probably over- kill, but I also wanted to avoid having the back wheel rest on the tailgate unsupported. Apparently there is some risk of the tailgate supports failing according to the truck owner’s manual. The heavy plywood would help distribute some of the weight off the tailgate. I then wrapped the plywood with a tarp and fastened it with staples. This would prevent the wood from getting soggy if it rained. I decided to take my V-Strom. It is lighter


than my RT, has better tie-down points and would be cheaper to replace if this project ended in disaster! After all the planning and everything in place, including straps to secure the ramp to the truck, I walked up the ramp picturing how I was going to ride it on. I realized once I got the front tire on the ramp I would not be able to stop until the back wheel was on too, because my legs would not be long enough to hold me up at that point. I then mustered my courage and rode the


bike up the ramp and onto the back of the truck without stopping until I was on the truck. It took a couple of attempts to get the wheel into the chock, but once I did, the bike was stable. I then tied down the front and back. With trepidation we left for our trip, fully expecting the motorcycle to fall over on the first corner. More than 900 miles later, it had not budged. The success of this trip has made me


some skin off my fingers and jamming the mechanism. I would also use this type of tie-down to secure the ramp to the truck while loading. I bought a locking wheel chock. Driving


the front wheel into this would keep the bike from falling over on me as I tied it down. Not wanting to drill mounting holes


more confident to do it again. I can see the rationale now: in certain situations, arriv- ing where you prefer to ride, with the appropriate bike for the style of riding you like to do. Arriving fresh and with tires that aren’t squared off from riding hundreds of straight miles...hmm, I wonder if my wife would notice an S 1000 RR in the garage!


skills


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116