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PRoductreviews


Instead, turn it on, sit on your bike, and play with it until your hand has memorized the control functions and what they bring to the display. Spend some time at it, however long it takes to develop a comfortable familiarity. You really do not want to be learning this thing while vectoring at lethal velocity. It’s intuitive and easy to learn—but still… Now back to the dis-


traction issue. The best discussion I’ve seen of this was in a string that followed a review at Motorcycle.com. The poster presented his case succinctly: “The U.S. military—


who invented these things—has identified a condition called 'Atten- tion Capture.' Essentially, your brain, which is pretty good at doing what it wants and not what you want it to, starts de-emphasizing actual reality happening outside the HUD in favor of the pretty color moving pic- tures put up by the HUD. “In combat aircraft…


the military has seen and documented declining pilot performance and has begun to de-emphasize such sys- tems, on the grounds that the distrac- tion and minute cognitive delays translate into risk of injury or death…”. His conclusion: “I just ride the eff-


ing bike, thankyouverymuch.” The flip side of that argument


shrinks the elephant pretty dramati- cally and is found in a response from the same string: “So how is using a GPS and looking


at it too much any different than what you describe? Isn't that even worse since it is not in the direct field of view? Why? Because while riding or


24 BMW OWNERS NEWS October 2017


going someplace new, they allow MORE attention to the road immediately ahead than to spending time searching for road signs and streets and addresses…” My experience riding with this unit tra-


versed a spectrum that opened with a strong appreciation for the elephant: yes, it started out being a distraction. But with


than pulling out my phone. For me, that boils this down to what I


believe is the core of the matter: the GPS. I ride in New Mexico, where bright sunshine can require a stop to read a handlebar- mounted GPS. And I ride in remote, lonely places where a wrong turn can cost you 50 miles or more to correct. The Nuviz GPS and maps are excellent and highly detailed. They take the stress out. You ignore the dis- play until you approach a turn- ing point, when a quick glance at the Heads Up Display con- firms your wayfinding, and you ride on with confidence. You know where you are going, and you don’t have to look down at a bar-mounted display (or at turning points written on your wrist) to figure out what’s next and when. Whether the Nuviz is for


you depends a lot on whether you’ve got $699 to throw down and on what you would find useful among the key functions included in this package. It may also depend on whether you’ve already invested in GPS, Bluetooth phone links or a hel- met cam. Value is in the eye— and wallet—of the beholder. The Nuviz is a well designed


and manufactured piece of technology, but just remember:


time, the display stopped nagging at my attention. I learned to look at the display only when I had a reason to and simply turned off the display when I didn’t need it. (You can turn off the display without turn- ing off the processor. This saves battery and does not require a full reboot to reactivate.) I found that beyond testing for fidelity (which is excellent), I rarely used the music function. I turned my phone off to prevent unwanted intrusion, except in a couple of cases where I really was anticipating an important call, and I really appreciated the option. I used the camera rarely, at which time I thought it was fun and a lot easier


this is not a video game. This is reality.


NUVIZ HEADS UP DISPLAY: Available at www.ridenuviz.com/products/ nuviz-head-up-display


PROS: Consolidates the functions of mul- tiple electronic devices into a single unit, is easy to control, and provides displays that require only a minor shift of focus to cap- ture. Thirty day return policy.


CONS: Distracting until thoroughly learned, or if not treated with discipline.


member tested


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