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Director’s report, as there were no further questions.


President Wes Fitzer: At this point we


don’t have any other board business, as I stated earlier, this board meeting is some- what of a perfunctorily meeting due to the fact that we all have rally responsibilities, those volunteer duties that each board member is responsible for. At this time I’ll open the floor for any questions from members.


A member present asks, “Could we


maybe think about moving the rally to sometime other than the middle of July? This has been a very hot rally.”


Director Marc Souliere answers, “About


five years ago, we did a survey. The survey included members at random, vendors, a broad sampling throughout the MOA community. The results of the survey indi- cated that the vast majority of people sur- veyed, indicated that anything before the first of July or anything after the end of August would cause a significant problem with being able to attend the rally. The board since has elected to stay in this time frame. We can go a little earlier, maybe the last weekend of June, but of course all of that depends on the availability of sites conducive to a rally, which are limited. If we go too far into the year, then we com- pete with the fair cycle, where these sites exist.”


Member comment: “Nobody else wants them in July.”


MARC SOULIERE: “Exactly. Moreover, if you go into early June, then you have fami- lies and kids that have to deal with the school schedule.”


MEMBER COMMENT: “I haven’t seen a whole lot of kids here.”


MARC SOULIERE: “We have a few. These are the main reasons right now we are in


WES FITZER: “To answer your question strategically, this board continues to look at opportunities to move the rally date to a more conducive time frame. We under- stand that as our demographic ages the heat will become more and more of a prob- lem. This board will continue to look at opportunities to have relief from that. I appreciate that comment. You are not the first person to come to me regarding this issue. “My wife and I rode to the rally from


Oklahoma, where we are from, and as we traveled through New Mexico, we encoun- tered 105 degree Fahrenheit temperatures during the day. We stopped to put on our cooling vests and get something to eat, get hydrated, and got back on the road. Later that day in Utah, we stopped again to get gas and re-drench our cooling vests, and there was a K 1600 GTL sitting in the park- ing lot of the gas station. As we went into the gas station to use the restroom, (there was a Wendy’sDairy Queen attached to the gas station) we noticed a rider sitting at a booth with his head down. I went inside to check on the rider, and he was obviously in severe heat exhaustion or some other state of heat injury. “Paula and I ended up sitting with him for several hours, getting some liquids in


October 2017 BMW OWNERS NEWS 105


July. We really looked at the possibility. Of course, if we did make a change we would have to look three to four years in advance because the vendors would have to be noti- fied and adjust their schedule. If we want them at our site, we have to give them two or three years notice.”


MEMBER COMMENT: “I understand that.”


MARC SOULIERE: “We also have the phi- losophy that we want to choose the sites in a rotating basis in the four regions, so that our members that can’t get away for a week will have an opportunity to attend. So when you take all of those things into con- sideration, it really does limit the time when we can do it.”


how decisions are made regarding the fidu- ciary responsibility of maintaining the investment account


in compliance with


our charter as an organization: “When we look at a non-profit organization such as ourselves, what’s our absolute obligation? It to service


through the range of that membership time period,


would bescenic the membership that’s our absolute. An example


would be when a director comes to me and Fall days and Arkansas


rides


wantsroa a certain amount of money for…let’s say, market research to obtain more mem- bers. That $50,000 figure,


ds go great together. Check out some of our


favorite rid s. to use Ian’s


example from earlier, has to come from 1


somewhere; if


can’t take it from an investment account that is nsot in a state of great excess as it has been in the past, wy nhere itd h teled 1.8 million dollars. So many good ideas cannot always be acted upon simp’ Cly becaeu pse we are flat in our budget at this time. We have to build that investment account back up.


PIG TRAIL SCENIC BYWAY One of t e m


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s by “


now, we are a little underwater in terms of where we would like to be. At the six month mark I would at least like to be even; obvi- ously, I would like to be ahead from that standpoint. I’ve set certain objectives that I have asked the board to help me with. One is I would like to have at least one month of money in the bank at all times; that would be a minimum in terms of how I think run- ning the business side of the organization should be approached. We set a goal of $25,000 - $50,000 a year to put back in the investment account to keep that growing. We need to talk about reinvesting in those resources for the charter clubs and the redevelopment of the staff personnel to do that. That takes a certain amount of cash to do that, as well as we need to look forward, and then long term; where are we going with all the other things that we are not able to do currently, whether it is in terms of social media, media in general, member- ship development and recruitment, events…pick whatever priority you would like at that point.”


“I would say that we are very flat right TALIMENA NATIONAL


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iage 3 ARKANSASARKANSAS This n t c


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treasure traverses almost the entire state from north to south. It crosses the Ozark and Ouachita mountain ranges along with the Arkansas River Valley.


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