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inclined into a turn, a skier’s inside leg is flexed more than the outside leg out of necessity. The higher the angle of inclination, the more the inside leg needs to flex. This affects the align- ment of the outside knee, bringing it toward the midline of the body without the platform angle changing. This effectively reduces the cant of the boot. The net result is this: Those who ski at high angles of inclination on hard snow are likely to need more cant in their boots than those who don’t. Furthermore, when measured with a


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ΖQ WKHVH SLFWXUHV RI 0HJDQ +DUYH\ %RXUNH DQG 0LNDHOD 6KLffULQ WKH VNLHUVȇ HGJH DQJOHV DUH PXFK GLffHUHQW 7KDWȇV GXH SULPDULO\ WR WKHLU GLffHUHQW DQJOHV RI LQFOLQDWLRQ %XW ERWK VNLHUV KROG EHFDXVH the platform angles of their outside skis are both ninety degrees or less.


plumb bob or carpenter’s square standing on a level surface, a person’s leg isn’t press- ing against the side of the boot cuff, as it would be in a turn. Depending on the boot and the liner, this effect can rob the skier of a measurable amount of cant. There are some fine skiers who can simply


pull a new pair of boots out of the box and ski perfectly well without giving a thought to canting. In that way, skiing has always been a sport in which the equipment, designed for some idealized average morphology, selects who is successful and who is less so. For the rest of us, in order to ski our best in all conditions, we owe it to ourselves to pay attention to this critical aspect of boot fitting and setup.


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A popular method of assessing canting requirements with a carpenter’s square. This produces a platform angle that will make the ski hold when the skier’s knee is over the middle of the foot.


Another common method for measuring a skier for cants, using a plumb bob. It’s mechanically equivalent to the method shown in the previous figure.


Ron LeMaster has spent more than 40 years as a ski coach and instructor. He has been a technical advisor to the U.S. Ski Team and Vail Ski School, and lectures frequently about tech- nique and biomechanics to ski schools and teams around North America, Europe, and other parts of the skiing world. A regular contribu- tor to skiing magazines, Ron is the author of four books on skiing, including Ultimate Skiing, his most recent. He continues to contribute to educational materials for PSIA-AASI, USSA and other organizations. Examples of his work can be found at www.ronlemaster.com.


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PSIA Team Coach Michael Rogan shows what good canting looks like. In a strong, supple stance with moderate angulation, his ski is holding with a platform angle of 90 degrees.


40 | 32 DEGREES • SPRING 2019


This woman’s boot is under-canted. Despite angulating at the hip and knee, the ski’s platform angle is too big for it to hold.


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This man’s boot is overcanted. With almost no angulation, his ski has a platform angle less than 90 degrees.


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