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LOCAL KNOWLEDGE: BY PETER KRAY


YOUR GIFT TO GUESTS EXTENDS FAR BEYOND THE LESSON PLAN L


ocal knowledge – of their resort, region, and especially the terrain where they teach – is a key asset in every instructor’s teaching toolkit. And one they use in every lesson.


From the moment you decide where to start a class, where you hope to finish it, and


even how to avoid the most crowded slopes during peak times, you enhance the guest experience by tapping into your personal wealth of “local” information. All while help- ing each student improve their skiing or riding and enjoy all that the mountain environ- ment has to offer. Yet you’ll rarely see a snowsports school advertise how


taking a lesson can enable guests to hit the mountain like a local, start the day with the best coffee, get a good seat at the best lunch spot, and, at the end of the day, find out where the most awesome après is always happening. “You don’t really see programs that celebrate that kind of


thing,” said PSIA Alpine Team member Robin Barnes. “It’s not even just which run you really have to ski, but also where to ski that run. Or what time to ski it. It’s being told something like how the best snow is always on skier’s left.”


Portillo is huge; its instructors make it more accessible.


Robin Barnes


30 | 32 DEGREES • SPRING 2019


BRENNAN METZLER


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