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JON BARNES barnesjonr@yahoo.com


When determining the best location for the receiver, pilots will notice that the servo leads are long enough to place the receiver to the very forward position in the fuselage. This location prevents all of the under-the-canopy wiring from obstructing the path from the twin inlet ducts to the front of the EDF unit.


Some might not be familiar with the unique type of mechanically mixed pushrods/control surface geometry used on this model. The assembly manual provides specific instructions, with accompanying sketches, to help pilots properly install the aileron and elevator pushrods.


The recommended control throws are also included in the assembly instructions, along with the recommended transmitter settings for both low and high rates. The small- diameter, twin-elevator pushrods are quite long out of necessity. In an attempt to limit excessive flexing, Freewing routes them through short sections of slightly larger-diameter tubing that are glued to the fuselage near the servos; however, the aft part of the elevator


pushrods, which are not contained in the tubing, are subject to excessive flex at larger commanded elevator deflections. The flexing results in compromised and imprecise elevator response and can also inhibit pilots from attaining the maximum available elevator deflection. Pilots can effectively mitigate this issue by using scrap servo horns, positioned somewhere in the middle of the length of the elevator pushrods subject to flexing, as supplemental pushrod guides. This 64 mm EDF jet comes out of the box without landing gear, so all flights will begin with a hand toss. The F-105’s shoulder-mounted wing configuration all but demands that pilots launch it with an overhand toss. Although pilots who are not accustomed to the art of the hand launch might find themselves nervous at the prospect of throwing an EDF into the air, adherence to the basic tenets of Hand Launching 101 will stack the odds in favor of success. Keep the model’s wing loading as lightweight as possible by using a 1,000 mAh LiPo battery pack on the maiden flights. Confirm that the model balances


SPECIFICATIONS:


TYPE: EDF-powered jet WINGSPAN: 20.9 inches LENGTH: 31.5 inches SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate


NEEDED TO COMPLETE: Minimum four-channel radio and receiver with delta mixing; 3S 1,000 to 2,200 mAh LiPo battery


WEIGHT: 12.5 ounces FLIGHT TIME: 3 to 4 minutes PRICE: $98 INFO: motionrc.com


FEATURES:


>> Costs less than $100 >> '\QDPLFDOO\ EDODQFHG ¿YH EODGH (') IDQ IRU HI¿FLHQW SRZHU


>> Minimal assembly >> Seldom-modeled Cold War-era jet


at the factory-recommended CG (center of gravity) and have an assistant perform the first launch—preferably someone who has proven proficiency in hand launching models. Run the throttle up to at least 75% and give the model a firm push forward directly into the wind. Aim for a point slightly above the horizon and make sure to follow through on the toss. After the Thunderchief has been trimmed out, pilots will have absolutely no problem launching it themselves. For someone using a Mode 2 transmitter,


THEPARKPILOT.ORG 43


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