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ASHLEY RAUEN ashleyr@modelaircraft.org SPECIFICATIONS:


TYPE: Battery balance charger CHARGE CURRENT: 2 x 0.1 to 7.0 amps DISCHARGE RATE: 0.1 to 1.0 amp CIRCUIT POWER: 2 x 80 watts CURRENT DRAIN BALANCING: 300 mAh per cell INPUT: 11.0 to 18.0 volts DC; 100 to 240 volts AC WEIGHT: 1.8 pounds PRICE: $99.99 INFO: venompower.com


FEATURES:


>> Dual charge circuitry >> Multi-chemistry charging >> Lithium cell-voltage monitoring


>> Multiple charging leads including: Alligator, Deans, EC3, EC5, JST, Receiver, Tamiya, and XT60


>> Lithium cell count: one to six cells >> NiCd/NiMH cell count: one to 15 cells >> Lead acid battery voltage: two to 20 volts >> LCD display >> Detailed operating manual


battery, determine the number of cells it has, and ask you to confirm that it is correct.


Photos by Matt Ruddick and Dillon Carpenter


time is programmed to allow the charger a certain amount of time (in minutes) to automatically check and detect the type of battery you have set it to charge. If the charger cannot determine the battery type in this timeframe, it will power down and the battery will not be charged. Advancing to the next screen lets you set the NiMH or NiCd sensitivity, if applicable. The following screen allows you to set the safety temperature cutoff if you have the temperature sensors connected.


Other options through this menu include waste time, safety timer, capacity cutoff, keep beep/buzzer (turns the sound on or off), and input power low cutoff. Each option can be set up with the decrease and increase buttons on the charger’s face. Because “waste time” might raise some eyebrows, I should explain that the setting will insert a time delay to occur after each charge and discharge process to allow a battery adequate time to cool down. Now your charger should be


programmed, and you will be taken back


to the screen that shows your battery type and voltage. Press the select button, which takes you to Program Select. Here you will make sure your setting is for the battery that you need to charge. The first option will ask you to set up the amps that you want to charge your battery at and the voltage of your battery. After that’s set, push the enter button again and hold it until you hear a beep. The Pro Duo will then check your


Press enter and the charging begins. The display will show your amps, current battery voltage, and how long you’ve been charging the battery. Hitting the increase button takes you to a new screen, where you can view the voltage of each individual cell. Because this is a balance charger, your voltage should be pretty much even across all cells. When charging is complete, the Pro Duo beeps to let you know it’s done. Disconnect your batteries, grab your models, and head out to the flying field. That’s all there is to it. This is a nice dual charger. The best part about the Venom Pro Duo is how easy it is to use. You don’t have to be a battery chemist to ensure that you are safely charging any batteries you might have collected during your years in model aviation.


During charging, the LCD display shows amps, battery voltage, and charge duration. Pushing the increase button allows you to view the voltage of each individual cell.


THEPARKPILOT.ORG 29


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