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Pritchett (Junior pilot). The F3P class includes models constructed from a variety of materials, such as balsa/Mylar, foam/carbon-


North Penn Aviation Club advisor Dr. Michael Voicheck is shown with future club members: his sons Will and Luke. Voicheck photo.


fiber/Mylar, and carbon-fiber/ Mylar. The construction varieties use a minimal skeleton framework covered with Mylar to produce the lightest possible structure. The receiver and servo cases are partially or completely removed. Direct- soldered, thin, lightweight wiring is used in place of standard wiring with connectors. The lightest model in the F3P class was a scant 42 grams (1.5 ounces) using a single one-cell 120 mAh LiPo battery to power the motor and radio. The Clik R2 (and its predecessors, Clik NG and


The numerous versions of the popular Twisted Hobbys Clik are all good entry-level aircraft for Precision Aerobatics because of their balance of durability, light weight, and relative ease of building.


The carbon-fiber skeleton and Mylar skin construction on the Clik, combined with a specialized propulsion system and electronics, yield an all-up flying weight of approximately 42 grams (1.5 ounces).


These are three of the many aerobatic EPP models that were flown at the annual North Penn High School Indoor Fly-In. Voicheck photo.


Clik V4) was by far the most popular model in the Sportsman class. Standard building methods and equipment produce flying weights of 120 to 140 grams (4 to 5 ounces) for the Clik. Various weight reduction


techniques can produce Clik airframes that are 90 to 100 grams (3 to 3.5 ounces). The benefits of a lighter- weight model are numerous. A lighter airplane can fly slower, giving a pilot more time to “see” maneuvers as they are happening. This makes it easier to learn maneuvers and allows more time for the pilot to correct mistakes. For additional information


(L-R): Dave Lockhart (captain), Greyson Pritchett (Junior pilot), Devin McGrath, and Joseph Szczur will represent the US at the 2019 FAI F3P World Championship for Indoor Model Aerobatic Aircraft in Greece.


about Precision Aerobatics and the maneuver sequences, visit Xavier Mouraux’s website dedicated to Indoor RC Aerobatics in Canada (xavier.mouraux.com/indoor/ f3p-canada.html) or the NSRCA (National Society of Radio Controlled Aerobatics; nsrca.us/index.php/sequences). More information about Indoor Pattern/F3P can be found in the RCGroups (rcgroups.com) forum.


THEPARKPILOT.ORG 25


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