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MARCH - APRIL 2018


4


Understand Your Easement


4


Don’t Get Scammed


8


Easter Morning- Casserole


theLight Post YOUR SERVICE


Want Better Service? Let’em trim your trees.


with right of way maintenance and ensure greater safety and reliability.


K


KEC Manager of Engineering Kevin Davis said the co-op has typically been lenient with members about trees growing near power lines. “In the past, we’ve allowed yard trees or limbs within six feet or less of our power lines,” he explained.


The problem with doing this, he added, is that rapid growth rates require the co-op to return within a year or two to prune the tree again. “Instead of a five to six year pruning cycle, we’re having to go back every year. This expense adds up,” Davis said.


Right of way maintenance is typically one of the largest expenditures in an electric utility’s budget. At KEC, the cost to maintains 4,092 miles of line is roughly $1 million per year.


iamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC) is tightening its policy on tree trimming to reduce expenses associated


“Ultimately, our goal is to keep our rates down, and right of way maintenance is a large part of that equation.”


“We want our members to understand that the money we spend on the right of way is an important part of their rates,” he said. “Ultimately, our goal is to keep our rates down, and right of way maintenance is a large part of that equation.”


It’s also a matter of safety—for KEC members and employees. Oklahoma statutes require a distance of six feet between power lines and vegetation or equipment. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)


recommends vegetation clearance of 10 feet or more from power lines to reduce the potential for electrocution and fires.


Reliability is another factor. A clean right of way ensures fewer blinks, and faster response and restoration times. Roughly 50 percent of KEC outages are caused by trees and limbs falling into or interfering with power lines, Davis said. While ice storms, high winds and tornadoes will always play a role in service reliability, keeping trees as far as possible from power lines can lessen the impact of these events when they occur.


When KEC right of way contractors arrive in your area, please give them your full cooperation. You’ll be doing yourself and your neighbors a big favor.


If you have questions about KEC’s right of way program, please call Kevin Davis at 800-888-2731, ext. 5618. To learn more about your right of way easement, please turn to page 3.


published for members of Kiamichi Electric Cooperative


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