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country living | 3


Celebrating Linemen Cont'd from pg. 1


still in the dark. With the passage of the :]ZIT -TMK\ZQÅKI\QWV )K\ QV !


\PQVO[


started to look up for those living in rural areas. By 1949 linemen had built electric transmission lines to farms and small towns across the country. In fact, from the time World War II ended in 1945 to 1949, the number of miles of line built IVL MVMZOQbML OZM_ UWZM \PIV Å^M NWTL


6W\ R][\ IVaWVM KIV LW \PM TQVMUIV [ RWJ# \PMa VW\ WVTa J]QTL TQVM \PMa IT[W maintain and repair it. ECE linemen I\\MVL Å^M \W [M^MV aMIZ[ WN IL^IVKML schooling and training to ensure the best quality of work on the co-op's 5,846 miles of line. They work approximately 300 days a year overhead and digging underground, in substations and on equipment spanning our entire electric


Are You a Co-op Voter? THAT'S A FACT:


The U.S. power grid, which has been called “the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century,” was built entirely by linemen.


system. While working overhead lines, they carry 63 pounds of equipment.


As we look to the future, with its seemingly limitless technological advances, East Central’s linemen are dedicated to the members of the cooperative and the legacy of the pioneering linemen before them. This month, we celebrate them for their commitment to our members and their profession. Please RWQV ][ QV \PIVSQVO I TQVMUIV


<285 &2ǧ23 /,1(0(1 By The Numbers


24/7 linemen are always ready to respond.


21 ECE linemen


committed to serving you.


5,846 miles of


5-6


years of advanced training is required to become an ECE journeyman lineman.


801,000 annual on-the-job


mileage for ECE linemen.


electric line owned and maintained by ECE.


Did you vote in the 2016 elections? If so, you were one of 500,000 additional voters in electric co-op territories that went to the polls. You helped turn the tide of decreasing voter turnout in rural IZMI[¸IVL MTMK\ML WffiKQIT[ \WWS VW\QKM


Voting plays a crucial part in our democracy. Federal, state and local MTMK\QWV[ WffMZ IV WXXWZ\]VQ\a NWZ you to exercise a civic responsibility by selecting the best leaders.


2018 is going to be an important election year, and electric coops will play a vital role in encouraging rural voter turnout.


Reliable electricity, rural infrastructure and access to rural broadband and other issues will only become priorities if rural voters continue to express \PMQZ KWVKMZV[ \W MTMK\ML WffiKQIT[ Registering to vote and showing up to the polls on Election Day are the most MffMK\Q^M _Ia[ \W [MVL \PQ[ UM[[IOM


<PQ[ aMIZ -I[\ +MV\ZIT -TMK\ZQK RWQV[ America’s electric co-ops in continuing the Co-ops Vote campaign to help get out the vote and insert issues important rural issues into the public discussion. <PQ[ MffWZ\ MV[]ZM[ \PI\ Z]ZIT ^WQKM[ IZM heard loud and clear every day, and especially on the next Election Day.


63 lbs


approximate weight of equipment carried by ECE linemen when climbing a pole


1939 ECE lines are


energized. The ƮUVW PHWHU LV set in Beggs.


Here’s what you can do to help. If you aren't registered to vote, do it now. Then, encourage your friends and family to register. Visit the Co-ops Vote web site, WWW.VOTE.COOP, to get information on how to register and to TMIZV UWZM IJW]\ aW]Z MTMK\ML WffiKQIT[ You can also learn more about the issues that matter in rural communities.


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