search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PAGE 2 | LIVEWIRE | APRIL 2018


Don’t Waste. Insulate!


Properly insulating your home reduces heating and cooling costs, and improves comfort. R-values measure a material’s resistance to conductive heat flow. The higher the R-value rating, the greater the effectiveness of the insulation. Below are recommended R-values for areas of the home that should be insulated.


*Recommendations on R-values are subject to regional climate conditions.


Source: U.S. Dept. of Energy


TYPES OF INSULATION Blow-in


Batt Foam Slab Crawlspace Stop By A


Spotlight You could win $100!


Mark your calendar to stop by these local businesses on your lunch hour.


See what the business has to off er and enter to win a $100 gift certifi cate sponsored by TCEC. You don’t need to be present to win and no purchase is required. Simply come by during the spotlight and drop your name in the drawing.


DUCTWORK


Whether it’s made of metal or plastic (PVC), insulated ductwork protects your investment in conditioned air year-round. Minimal R-values of 4.3 are recommended for blanket-style wraps secured with tape. Insulated ductwork rated at R-6 is also available.


EXTERIOR WALLS


There are multiple options for insulating exterior walls. Rock wool or fiberglass batts of R-13 to R-20 value are preferred behind drywall, but each inch of blown-in polyurethane foam insulation provides an R-value of 3.9.


April 12, Noon to 1 p.m. All Fired Up Gallery 421 N. Main Street Guymon, Oklahoma


May 1, Noon to 1 p.m. Golden Crown 412 N. Main Street Guymon, Oklahoma


BENEATH LIVING SPACE


Whether your home has a full basement, a crawl space or an attached garage, having an insulation value of R-19 under the living space floor will help increase comfort year-round.


SLAB FOUNDATION


Properly installed foam boards around the exterior edge of the slab of an existing home can reduce heating bills by 10 percent or more.


Watch TCEC’s Facebook page for more details. n


Energy Effi ciency Tip of the Month


Make sure your refrigerator door seals are airtight for maximum energy efficiency. Test the seal by closing the door over a piece of paper (so that it’s half in and half out). If you can easily pull the piece of paper out, your seal may need to be replaced or the latch may need to be adjusted.


Source: Energy.gov


Electrical Safety Tip of the Month


811 is the national “Call Before You Dig” phone number. It was created to help prevent people from coming into contact with underground utility lines during digging projects. Always call 811 before you start a digging project.


Source: Safe Electricity


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128