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Northfork Electric Cooperative, Inc.


Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER


BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ....................Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres..............Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas........ Erick Chris Mackey................................Sayre Larry Smith ............................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ..........................Sayre Brent Meador.............................Elk City Brendon Atkinson......................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Lisa Dailey....Dir. of Admin./Office Services Richard Bowdre..... Dir. of Operations/Eng. Jeff Mohr.............Dir. of Strategic Planning Kay Brown .................. Executive Ass’t./HR Heath Martin.......................Safety Director


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ...................... 655-4557 By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


With spring comes a feeling of renewal. Families everywhere begin cleaning out their basements and garages. Windows are opened, flowers bloom and the days grow longer thanks in part to Daylight Saving Time. When you set your clocks forward, the National Safety Council reminds you also to review a safety checklist for your home and replace the batteries in all your alarms.


Smoke Alarms


Smoke alarms save lives – if they are powered by a fresh battery. You should test them every month to make sure they work and replace the battery at least once a year, according to the National Fire Protection Association. If the alarm makes a “chirping” sound, replace the battery immediately.


Smoke alarms should be located in every bedroom and in the common areas on each floor of the home. Mount them at least 10 feet from the stove to reduce false alarms, less than 12 inches from the ceiling and away from windows, doors and ducts. Did you know smoke alarms can be interconnected wirelessly? That means, when one sounds, they all sound. A Consumer Product Safety Commission survey found this is the best way to notify everyone in a home if there is a fire. Be sure to purchase smoke alarms with the label of a reputable testing agency, like Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Three out of every five home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms, according to NFPA.


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) (580) 928-3366


PAY BY PHONE TOLL-FREE 844-759-3983


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


ADDRESS P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 18920 E. 1170 Rd.


Carbon Monoxide Detectors


Carbon monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless gas, and it can kill you. Anything in the home that burns fuel can potentially become a source of carbon monoxide. CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each bedroom and on every level of the home. The safety tips for CO detectors mirror those of smoke alarms: change the batteries, test them and interconnect them, if possible. Also, make sure vents for your gas appliances (fireplace, dryer, stove and furnace) are free and clear of snow or debris.


Family Emergency Plan


The National Safety Council recommends every family have an emergency plan in place in the event of a natural disaster or other catastrophic event. Spring is a great time to review that plan with family members to make sure they know what to do. Have a home and car emergency kit. The Federal Emergency Management Agency says


This institution is an equal oppor- tunity provider and employer.


an emergency kit should include one gallon per day of water for each person, at least a three- day supply of food, flashlight and batteries, first aid kit, filter mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape, and medicines. Visit the FEMA website for a complete list. The emergency plan also should include: • A communications plan to outline how your family members will contact one an- other if they are not in the same place and where you should meet if it’s safe to go outside • A shelter-in-place plan if outside air is contaminated; FEMA recommends sealing windows, doors and air vents with plastic sheeting • A getaway plan including various routes and destinations in different directions The National Safety Council recommends you practice and maintain your plan and sup- plies, update your first aid kit, and make sure to identify your meeting place. For more emer- gency plan information log onto FEMA.gov or feel free to contact me at 580-928-3366.


Safety Off-the-Job  Spring: A Great Time to Review Your Safety Checklist


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