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INDUSTRY NEWS


GIS Launches Draxton Brand Grupo Industrial Saltillo, S.A.B. de C.V., a Mexican multi-


national industrial conglomerate serving the automotive market, with a presence in the construction and housewares sectors, announced the consolidation of the three auto parts businesses— CIFUNSA, ACE and INFUN—into one unit named Draxton. Draxton will be the name of the new consolidated unit and the brand name for all of the unit’s products. Draxton, along with the company’s joint ventures,will serve more than 50 customers in the automotive industry in six countries that represent the main markets for the sector. T e capacity of the GIS auto parts sector will exceed 550,000 tons of iron casting, 10,000 tons of aluminum casting and 15 million machined parts to supply global platforms. “T e formation of Draxton marks the culmination of a key


stage in our globalization strategy. By unifying our original auto parts business, CIFUNSA, with two recent acquisitions ACE and INFUN, we expanded our presence to Europe and Asia,” GIS CEO Jose Manuel Arana said. “In Draxton, we are capitalizing on synergies, implementing shared best practices, and creating a new global brand in the automotive industry. For GIS, this will be our core business that today generates 70% of the group’s revenues.” Draxton and GIS JVs will continue to be led by Jorge Rada,


global director since 2016, who has more than 25 years of experi- ence in the automotive industry. T is division consists of more than 4,000 employees, 14 plants and three R&D centers known globally as Draxton 4 Competitiveness (DC4).


Magellan announces agreement


with aeroengine customer Magellan Aerospace (Toronto) announced the signing of a


fi ve-year agreement with a commercial aeroengine customer to manufacture complex magnesium and aluminium castings and fi nished, machined engine shafts for gas turbine engines. T e castings will be produced by Magellan’s facilities in


Haley, Ontario, and Glendale, Arizona, and Magellan’s facility in Haverhill, Massachusetts will manufacture the engine shafts. T e new agreement is expected to generate approximately CDN $53 million in revenue for Magellan through 2023. “T is new long-term agreement is with an established


Magellan customer and provides the framework for a new level of strategic alignment,” the company said in a news release. “In addition to legacy casting programs for cur- rent engine platforms, the agreement also encompasses the production of shafts at Magellan Aerospace, Haverhill, Inc. to support additional commercial engine programs.” Magellan Aerospace is a global aerospace company


that provides complex assemblies and systems solutions to aircraft and engine manufacturers, and defense and space agencies worldwide. Magellan designs and manufactures aeroengine and aerostructure assemblies and components for aerospace markets, advanced proprietary products for mili- tary and space markets, and provides engine and component repair and overhaul services worldwide.


MARK’S THOUGHT OF THE MONTH


“Respond to disrespect with respect, to thoughtlessness with understanding. Be the person to improve the quality of interaction.”


- The Daily Motivator™ © Ralph S. Marston Jr.


CAUGHT EMPTY-HANDED?


INDUSTRY NEWS


Don’t let a lack of cores halt your molding line. Add Humtown Products to your supply chain, and have high- quality cores delivered to you on time, every time.


www.humtown.com 330.482.5555 May 2018 MODERN CASTING | 11


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