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Texas to Host Metalcasting Congress


People from all sectors of the metalcasting supply chain will be traveling to Fort Worth, Texas, next month for information on the latest trends of the industry.


A MODERN CASTING STAFF REPORT


Congress put on by the American Found- ry Society. Te show includes sessions on technical breakthroughs, production and management best practices, and business development for the industry, along with AFS Institute courses, keynote speakers, networking events and an exhibit floor. Tis year’s show floor will be packed with almost 200 exhibitors from the industry supply chain and open on April 4-5. A free reception on the exhibit floor will be held April 4 from 4:30-6 p.m., and a free continental breakfast will be at 9:30 a.m. on April 5. Two main registration options are


T


available: for exhibits only or for educa- tion and exhibits. Tose registered with Education and Exhibits passes will have access to two and a half days of techni- cal and management sessions and AFS Institute courses, along with access to the exhibition and keynote presenta- tions. Discounts will be given to AFS members at registration and to those who join AFS while registering for Metalcasting Congress. To register, go to www.metalcastingcongress.com. Te AFS Institute is offering three courses this year: Virtual Casting Process, Identifying the Correct Casting De- fect, and Creating a Culture of Respect Trough Feedback. Te latter course will be led by Cindy Maher and Jamie Guite of Leading Edge Coaching & Develop- ment and go over ways to support a thriv- ing workplace through properly delivering and receiving feedback. Te three keynote speakers at


Metalcasting Congress anchor each day, starting with Jean Bye’s account of how


he metalcasting supply chain will convene in Fort Worth, Texas, April 3-5, for the annual Metalcasting


Metalcasting Congress brings together suppliers, metalcasters, casting end-users, and students together in one place.


AFS Corporate Member Dotson Iron Castings (Mankato, Minnesota) recov- ered from a devastating fire in 2017. Bye, the president and CEO of the company, will share the lessons learned throughout the process relating to disaster prepared- ness. On April 4, Dan Oman of Haley & Aldrich will deliver the Hoyt Memo- rial Lecture on changing perceptions of metalcasting from that of a smokestack industry using low technology. Finally, on April 5, economist Stephen Moore will give an economic and political update. Moore has a deep background in economics and politics, having served as the senior economic advisor to the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and now acting as the distinguished visiting fellow for the Project for Economic Growth at the Heritage Foundation. At the Annual Banquet on April 3,


two leaders will receive the industry’s top honor, the AFS Gold Medal. Tey


are John R. Keough, proprietor, Joyworks LLC (Ann Arbor, Michigan) and Dr. David V. Neff, retired, Metaullics Systems (Aurora, Ohio). Tickets are required to attend the Annual Banquet. Other networking events include the Copper Division Luncheon, Women in Metalcasting Breakfast, Division Recogni- tion Luncheon, Alumni Dinner, Future Leaders of Metalcasting meeting and the Presidents Luncheon. For more informa- tion or to get tickets for these events, visit www.metalcastingcongress.com. Metalcasting Congress is being held


in the Fort Worth Convention Center in downtown Fort Worth. It is located 17.5 miles from DFW International Airport. Fort Worth is the 16th largest city in the U.S. and welcomes 8.8 million visitors annually. Tis area is home to a collection of museums and natural wonders such as the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens, plus seven entertainment districts.


March 2018 MODERN CASTING | 45


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