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AFS NEWS


St. Marys Foundry CEO testifies before Congress on skills gap Te president and CEO of AFS Corporate Member


St. Marys Foundry (St. Marys, Ohio) spoke to members of Congress about the skills gap and small business workforce shortages June 14. Angela Dine Schmeisser, a fourth-generation owner


whose foundry employs 160 people, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Small Business during a hearing titled “Shrinking the Skills Gap: Solutions to the Small Business Workforce Shortage.” Te hearing examined the state of the current small


business workforce and provided an opportunity for small business owners and experts to provide innovative solutions to combat the small business employee shortage. “If you gather a group of metalcasters and ask them what their biggest challenge is today, you’ll likely hear them respond in unison: difficulty in filling job openings and retaining workers.” Schmeisser testified. “Changing public perceptions to match the realities of U.S. manu- facturing is critical to addressing the worker shortage in our sector, especially among Millennials. Also important is rebuilding a pipeline of potential recruits through high school and career technical programs.” Te hearing was recorded, and Schmeisser’s testimony picks up at minute 24 at this link: https://bit.ly/2KdjtfG


Angela Dine Schmeisser (center) speaks with Dave Brat (R-Virginia) (right), the chairman of the U.S. Committee on Small Business Subcom- mittee on Economic Growth, Tax and Capitla Access. Schmeisser was in Washington, D.C. to testify about the workforce shortages small busi- nesses face.


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