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Dos and Don’ts of Dust Collection Maintenance


Properly maintaining and operating dust collection systems can


reap large direct and indirect returns on investment. DOMINICK DALSANTO, BAGHOUSE.COM (LAS VEGAS)


F


ollowing industry best practices in dust collector maintenance and operation keeps dust collection systems in good working order, which directly impacts production, health and safety, and environmental collection, and minimizes system


operating costs. Combustible dust or silica dust hazards create huge potential


liabilities, including the potential for citations, fines and even forced shutdowns, resulting in lost production. Keeping a system well maintained helps a metalcasting facility stay compliant with emissions and environmental health and safety standards. Plus, improved reliability results in less downtime, extends the useful life of equipment, and extends the life of consumable items. Additionally, increased or maintained dust collection capacity


allows for increased production levels. A properly designed, installed, and maintained dust


collector will include the following basic features, among others: • Uniform air and dust distribution to all filters. • Completely sealed system, from dust pickup to stack outlet.


• Total seal between the dirty side and the clean side of the collector (i.e. no leaks in the filters or in the tubesheet/ cell plate separating the dirty and clean sides).


• Properly installed filter bags. • Clean and dry compressed air in the cleaning system. • Properly installed and operating mechanical components and fans.


• Effective coatings and paint. • Properly installed insulation in high temperature units. For many, dust collection systems are neglected or


ignored until something goes wrong. But paying attention to the following dos and don’ts of maintenance and operation can reap large direct and indirect returns on investment that more than justify the attention and resources required to carry them out.


Don’t: Neglect the cleaning system. Te cleaning system is the heart of the baghouse and the


source of the majority of efficiency gains or losses. In pulse jet collectors (the most common style), oil, water and dirt can get into the compressed air. Te cleaning system can also suffer from damaged valves, worn diaphragms and leaking connections that are never fixed or replaced. Undercleaning produces high differential pressure, reduces


The cleaning system is the heart of the baghouse. 28 | MODERN CASTING July 2018


suction at pickups and lowers velocity in the ductwork. However, overcleaning shortens bag life, wastes expensive compressed air, raises emissions and wears out diaphragms.


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