search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
months trying to figure out what he wanted to do with the vacant prison and acreage.


He wasn’t expecting a random call from a stranger in Virginia to lead him down the path he’s on today.


“I considered about 10 different possibilities for this location, but none of them really interested me,” says Goldsmith. “Earlier this year, a man from Virginia, Larry Williams, called me and said he wanted to discuss a proposition. He basically told me, ‘I’m a vet. I was born and raised 30 miles from here in Uniontown. I know that there is an enormous problem in this particular area because there are not enough services and programs for veterans. I really think the perfect solution for you and for the vets is to turn this place into a facility that helps our veterans.’”


This idea spoke to the heart of the English-born busi- nessman, who served in the Merchant Navy in the U.K. before he took up residence in the U.S. Williams connected Goldsmith to Ward, who helped the de- veloper put together a plan of action to get things moving forward. Ward and others have spent count- less hours researching how to best use the facility to improve not just the well-being of veterans, but also that of the local community.


And the rest is history…in the making. THE BUILDING MISSION


The development is anticipated to take two to three years to complete, with remodeling and repurposing starting this fall. The anticipated budget for this effort is set at $150 million. Preliminary plans indicate that the center will temporarily house and/or provide medical treatment to approximately 1,500 veterans each year.


Prior to the rehab facility’s completion, local design- ers, builders, suppliers and various subcontractors will handle the renovation of the existing buildings as well as new construction of transitional living quarters located outside of the main building area.


Once operational, the one-stop veterans center will offer short-term housing, an onsite medical clinic to address health concerns and provide rehabilitation therapy


PRELIMINARY PLANS FOR HOPE, HEALING AND HEALTH


The future Greensburg Veterans Sunrise Center will serve as a rehabilitation campus that caters to the immediate needs of veterans as they re-acclimate to civilian lifestyles. Preliminary design considerations to promote hope, healing and health include:


• A medical treatment facility


• A health and wellness area with different amenities, including a fitness center, physical rehab spaces and a therapy pool


• A new multi-use field and courtyard for recreational purposes


• A guidance and support area that offers services, such as family support, counseling and child care, and contains a chapel


• A vocational and life-skills training building containing a professional- grade culinary kitchen, computer lab, classrooms and a library


• Veteran women and children’s housing, single-living housing, and additional multi-family housing


• A renovated living area containing common areas, dorm-style living spaces, and other places for recreation and social activities


POWERED BY THE BLUE BOOK NETWORK - PITTSBURGH & WESTERN PA / FALL 2016


33


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106