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PRODUCT PREVIEWS


and the cost benefi ts of an index- able insert tool. The new tool is ideal for machining larger threads with diameters of 1" (24 mm) and above. In a test involving large- scale crankshaft machining, the new thread milling cutter reduced costs by 60%. The universal grade cutter features easy-cutting geom- etry and wear resistance. Walter USA LLC Ph: 800-945-5554 Web site: www.walter-tools.com/us


New Tools Smooth Out Rough Boring New CoroBore rough-boring tools help shops deal with challenges such as vibration, chip-breaking and process security. The combination of CoroBore with Coromant Capto and Coromant EH modular systems en- ables users to be highly fl exible in production. This delivers added-value through reduced tool investment and inven- tory. Each solution is available either separately or as part of a complete tool assembly kit. Single-, twin- or triple-edged rough-boring tools are offered. The CoroBore BR20 is a twin-edge rough-boring concept that uses a differential pitch to reduce vibration and enable use at longer over- hangs and larger depths of cut. The tool also features built- in step-boring functionality without any need for an extra shim. Coolant nozzles handle coolant pressure up to 70 bar


(1015 psi), aiding chip evacuation. The same tool is also available with Silent Tools technology. This damped version is ideal for long overhangs or where additional stability is required. Sandvik Coromant Ph: 201-794-5000 Web: www.sandvik.coromant.com


Belt Conveyor Oven


No. 897 is a 350°F (177°C) belt conveyor oven used for preheating trays of parts prior to potting operations. Workspace measures 36” (914 mm) W × 120" 3048 mm) D × 15" (381) H. Heating is supplied by 30-kW Incoloy-sheathed tubular heat- ing elements. A 6000 CFM, 5-hp (3.7-kW) recirculating blower provides vertical downward airfl ow to the workload. This belt conveyor oven has a 48" (1219-mm) long open belt loading zone and a 10' (3-m) long insulated heat zone with recircu- lated airfl ow. Features include a 30" (762-mm) wide, 1 × 1" (25.4 × 25.4-mm) high carbon steel fl at wire conveyor belt with 1/4-hp (0.19-kW) motor drive, variable from 1.4 to 27 ipm (35-885 mm/min). Additional features include a manually oper- ated vertical lift door at unload with viewing window. The oven also has a photo cell to automatically stop the belt when parts reach the unload position. Grieve Corp.


Ph: 847-546-8225 Web site: www.grievecorp.com


92 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


CLASSIFIEDS PRODUCTS/SERVICES


OIL MIST & SMOKE IN YOUR SHOP?


www.mistcollectors.com Tel: 1-800-645-4174


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