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limits for reliability, allowing railroads today to haul heavier loads over greater distances. Amsted Rail manufactures everything from wheels, axles and bearings to brake systems, bogies, bolsters and more. The company confi rms component design, manufacturing engineering and performance at technology and engineering test centers dedicated to bogie (truck) testing, bearing performance, and wheel engineering using the latest materials.


In 2014, Amsted Rail became aware that the existing chip conveyors used in its large steel part turning operations at its Petersburg, VA manufac- turing facility were falling apart. The conveyors were constantly jamming up from having bushy stringers not being conveyed out of the units. From what Mark Vieira, machining process engineer, observed, the main- tenance technicians were using a pipe wrench on the motor shaft to force the conveyor past the jam.


Before the Jorgensen Munchman II conveyors, bushy stringers would jam Amsted Rails’ old conveyors leading to loss of 96 hours of production per machine each year to clean our coolant tanks during regular working hours.


In search of a solution, Vieira attended the 2014 IMTS show in Chicago where he visited the Jorgensen Conveyors booth. He was introduced to Jorgensen’s Munchman II chip


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August 2017 | AdvancedManufacturing.org 83


© The helmet was programmed and produced by DAISHIN


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