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AUTOMATION


on a clipboard.” As Suica explained, “Most of the downtime on a machine is caused by humans...waiting on a tool...fi guring out the program...manually punching in tool offsets. Once that hour of setup is spent, you never get it back for production.”


This points to the biggest and most


signifi cant improvement in linear pallet systems over the last few years: software. To one degree or another, all FMS providers offer capacity planning software that makes it possible to maximize system throughput. Hansel described a typical scenario: “Let’s say you have several machines, 180 tools in each magazine, 24 fi xtures, and certain jobs that have to get out to meet your contracts. You set parameters like the priority of the jobs and the numbers you need by certain times. Or say you’re building a car. You wouldn’t


This fl exible manufacturing system from Makino (which they call MMC2) illustrates the basic components of any FMS.


Form cutter for the turbine blade industry - fir tree cutter Ø14.4 mm, 3 flutes, form length 21mm, form tolerance 1- 2 µm Ground on the GrindSmart®


628XS/628XW. The smart choice.


produce two axles and three wheels. You’d need four wheels. So you can tell the software to produce lot sizes. In either case, the software automatically calculates how to use your resources properly to get the production you need. If you plan properly and prepare fi xtures and tooling and then let the software do the work for you, a run rate of 90–95% is completely achievable.”


Hall 6 booth H12 www.rollomaticusa.com 70 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


Good Fit for Job Shops... and More Who benefi ts from an FMS? Anyone from a small job shop to an operation making 100,000 or more of a part, in some situations. John Einberger, product line manager, Makino Inc. (Mason, OH) said, “The sweet spot for this technology is someone who has a variety of products to run, in a somewhat random order, with relatively short production runs. By doing the work-setting off the machining center, you increase spindle utilization. “But there are also applications for higher production volumes among people who have seasonal production,” he continued. “For example, let’s say they make 80,000 of something a year, but they make it only for three months, and then they run a variant or something different for the next four months. The recreational vehicle powertrain industry fi ts this kind of production scheme. During the off-season they’re making what they need during the season, like boat motors when snowmobiles are selling, and snowmobile motors


Illustration courtesy Makino


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