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HORIZONTAL MACHINING CENTERS


U.S. MANUFACTURER OF CUSTOM AND STANDARD CARBIDE CUTTING TOOLS


On-site manufacturing gives MITGI the ability to deliver high quality standards and specials every time.


MITGI standard tools are available in


three days or less: • Micro End Mills • Micro Drills • Coolant Thru Micro Drills • Coolant Thru Thread Mills • • • • • •


Keyseat Cutters Drafted Mold Tools • Deburring Knives


Clearance Cutter Mold Tools Tapered Rib Cutter Mold Tools Hard Milling End Mills Step Drills


centers are very stiff and rigid for heavy-duty cutting. The MB Series is designed for dynamic machining and high-speed cutting. The latest addition to the MA Series is the MA-600II, which incorporates powerful high-torque spindle options for high-volume material removal rates. It’s available with an HSK-A100 20,000-rpm spindle that boasts 50/55-kW power for everything from heavy-duty cutting to fi ne precision work on aluminum alloys, cast irons, and diffi cult-to-machine materials.” The MA-600II allows for steady milling, boring, drilling, and tapping for applications from mass production of parts to long, continuous cycles for die/mold. Burrell foresees a future in which automation between ma- chines of different types will be readily integrated into cells us- ing a universal pallet system, mixing horizontals with verticals or fi ve-axis machining centers. “Interest in automation on all of the horizontal machines is coming from across the board, from the smallest to the largest shops,” he said. “Automation isn’t out of reach for even the smallest shops.” Okuma HMCs feature rotary pallets, pallet pool systems, Fastems systems, and robots for machining large mold and die work as well as high-volume production. Flexible manu- facturing can be achieved via 6–12 multipallet APC units and multiple matrix magazines that hold up to 400 tools. “We’re not a one-size-fi ts-all machine tool builder. It’s impor- tant to ask the customer what kind of work is coming through the shop and matching the right spindle and machine to that workload,” said Burrell. “We offer a 6000-rpm, high-torque spindle for machining Inconels, titaniums, and high-temp alloys, for example. For aluminum and a wider breadth of materials we offer a 15,000-rpm spindle for high-speed machining.”


HMCs Designed to Adapt Easily to Automation “What I see for Makino’s horizontal machining centers is the need to maintain the ability to adapt stock machines to fi t into a changing marketplace,” said John Einberger, horizontal machining center product line manager, Makino Inc. (Mason, OH). “For example, we often see a need to adapt standalone machines to operate in an automated en- vironment. It’s the loudest call for change from our custom- ers. To accomplish this, we pay a lot of attention in HMC design to make them easy to retrofi t automation support options such as auto doors, fi xture hydraulics, and coolant wash systems both quickly and cost effectively. As another example, we make it easy to integrate machines initially installed as standalone units into our MMC2 pallet handling system or the MMCR robot loading cell. We also offer a


Phone: (320) 455-0535 Web: www.mitgi.us


62 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


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