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MILLING TOOLS


technologies continue to improve, according to Walther. Features that improve chip shape, chip control and surface fi nish are also important advances. “For example, the new OSG HFC-Ti solid-carbide high-feed end mill is designed not only for extremely high feed rates, but for simultaneously fl oor fi nishing in titanium alloys,” she said. (Floor fi nishing is a process for fi nishing the fl oors of pock- ets in precision parts.) “The OSG PHC high-feed indexable cutter has insert grades XP2040 for stainless steels and XC5040 for heat-resistant superalloys. These inserts are optimized at their cutting edge geometry, substrate and coating for just such materials.” Sumitomo recently introduced two new inserts that are effective for HFM. “Our WFXH utilizes high-positive, square inserts that allow us to reach DOCs up to 1 mm, with a lighter feed rate than a standard high-feed mill but with lower cutting forces. It’s designed for less rigid, high-speed machines,”


Seco Tool’s most recent HFM advancement is the High Feed 6, a free-cutting double-sided insert that cuts like a tool with a positive axial rake but with the economy of a double-sided insert, according to the company.


said Schultz. “Sumitomo has also developed a double-nega- tive style cutter with a square insert that provides eight cutting edges. It is in fi eld testing and due to be released soon.” However, Sumitomo’s established Trigon-style inserts,


with three cutting edges, are HFM workhorses. “The Trigon is considered a 90°-type tool, but it has relief and clearance for chip evacuation, and has the best lead angle compared to round or square inserts” said Schultz. “The fi rst edge has a fl at facet that works as a wiper on the bottom that can main- tain surface fi nish, the second edge has a high lead angle for chip thinning, and the third, and most important for versatility, edge has a radius around the outside corner to do angles, walls, profi ling and 3D profi ling. It allows us to get close to our fi nish dimensions, unlike some other geometries.” The MSX, which holds Sumitomo’s Trigon style insert,


is probably the best high-feed technology the company offers, according to Schultz. “We offer four different inserts ICs [inscribed circles]: 6, 8, 12 and 14 mm.” He added that Sumitomo offers Top Clamp, an extra clamp with a screw in the center that adds extra rigidity, and dependability to cutter performance, when needed, to a tool setup. Walter’s latest HFM development is the M4002 product


family, part of the M4000 “system insert” program: one insert can be used in a variety of different milling tools commonly


54 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


found in machine shops, including 90° face mills, high-feed mills, center cutting end mills, 45° face mills, chamfer tools, and T-slot cutters. “Only one insert needs to be purchased, inventoried and consumed, allowing the end user to maximize economy of scale and make buying and storing inserts easy,” said Pollock. He added that M4000 inserts are available with Walter’s latest coating technology, Tiger Tec Gold (WKP35S), an ultra-low pressure CVD process for coating milling inserts used to machine steels and cast irons. Iscar is going back to the future with its new HFM tools. “Within the past year, we introduced the FFQ4, which goes back to the old single-sided cutting tool design, for diffi cult-to-machine materi- als,” said Raun. “It provides fl ank relief and more positive axial and radial relief angles, which help reduce heat better than double-sided technologies, like our H 600 feed mill. Also, we reduced the lead angle on the FFQ4. Typically a feed mill will have a 12–17° lead angle, but


with the FFQ4 we reduced it to 9°. That plays nicer with lighter duty machines and long overhang environments.” For ISO S and ISO M materials, Iscar is seeing large


increases in tool life and improved wear characteristics with its IC882 insert, which has a hard PCD nanolayer coating, and the IC5820, with a CVD coating. As with its other tool coatings, Iscar uses a post-coating smoothing process on its two new inserts to improve chip fl ow over the rake, which produces a cleaner, more accurate cutting edge. Also, in four to fi ve months Iscar will be releasing a new family of tools that it says will be very effective for HFM. “We came out with our H600 family in 2007, and it’s been a great HFM tool for a decade, but now we are going to have the new best thing,” said Raun. “Stay tuned!”


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Iscar Metals Inc. 817-258-3200 / www.iscarmetals.com


OSG USA Inc. 800-837-2223 / www.osgtool.com


Seco Tools LLC 248-528-5200 / www.secotools.com


Sumitomo Electric Carbide Inc. 800-950-5202 / www.sumicarbide.com


Walter USA LLC 800-945-5554 / www.walter-tools.com


Photo courtesy Seco Tools


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