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MILLING TOOLS


up subsequent semifinishing and finish operations. Because it uses a lighter step down, HFM does not lead to large scal- lops and large steps like a 90° cutter would, making finishing easier and more efficient.”


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grown from there, according to Shane Schultz, applications engineer, Sumitomo Electric Carbide Inc. (Mount Prospect, IL). “It’s highly versatile; with the proper insert geometry and setup for HFM, you can also mill holes via helical interpolation, open up holes, perform shoulder milling, create profiles, or do plain old slabbing, often in the same setup,” he said. “That’s helpful if you don’t have room for redundant tooling in your toolchanger.” The pro- cess also works well in low-horsepower machines, adding to their versatility. Schultz agreed that HFM is particularly effective for long, 15–20" [381–508-mm] reaches, deep cavities, tall fixtures, or large weldments. “I preach this in my seminars all the time,” he said. “In these situations, HFM is our first recommendation for removing material because of its high axial forces in Z. Other milling approaches are likely to produce tangential forces that cause chatter and vibration.” Tyler Martin, STEP technician for


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Seco Tools LLC (Troy, MI), added that manufacturers should consider HFM for one key reason: productivity. “Advancements in grades and edge preparations have enhanced a highly productive machining method, helping to increase tool life and reduce power consumption,” he said. “More difficult- to-machine work materials are being used than 10 years ago, and HFM is an excellent choice for these materials.” For example, when machining gray cast iron or softer steels, HFM may not be a good choice, but for hard steels, superalloys, or difficult-to-machine stainless steel, HFM will almost always be the most productive choice, accord- ing to Martin. HFM’s ability to reduce cycle time


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in hard materials or 3D shapes with tapered walls and/or curved surfaces


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