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Photo courtesy Walter USA


MILLING TOOLS


Heady Times for High-Feed Milling


New technology boosts a tried and true process


Alan Rooks Editor in Chief


H


Directing cutting forces axially allows Walter’s M4002 high-feed mill to work effectively, even with long-reach applications.


igh-feed milling (HFM) has been used for years to achieve high metal-removal rates, increase productivity and decrease workpiece cycle time. The roughing pro- cess—applicable for both solid-carbide and indexable insert tools—combines a shallow depth of cut (DOC) with a large cutting radius and small lead angle to ensure that the cutting forces are directed axially towards the machine spindle. It allows feed rates up to 10 times higher than normal rough milling. Why should part manufacturers consider implementing


HFM or, if they are already using the technique, consider more advanced HFM technologies? According to Tom Raun, milling product manager, Iscar Metals Inc. (Arlington, TX), there are three key reasons. “High-feed milling is easy to implement, and because it takes a light axial DOC it can work with a broad range of gage lengths—including tool assemblies with long overhangs,” he said. “It also works well with modern CAM toolpaths, such as VoluMill and Mastercam’s Dynamic Motion, that allow users to cut more aggressively. Finally, HFM allows you to get to near-net shape quickly and set


August 2017 | AdvancedManufacturing.org 47


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