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TECH FRONT


this question. When zinc batteries discharge, their electrodes react with the liquid electrolyte inside the battery, producing zinc salts that dissolve into a solution. This eventually short circuits the battery. Adding bismuth oxide keeps the electrode from losing zinc to the electrolyte. This ensures that the batter- ies continue to work and can be recharged. The work shows that it is possible to use small amounts of additives, such as bismuth oxide, to change the properties of materials.


“Understanding the scientific mechanism to do this will allow us to turn nonrechargeable batteries into rechargeable batteries—not just zinc batteries but also for other electro- chemistries, such as Lithium-oxygen,” said Meng, who directs the Sustainable Power and Energy Center at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. Rajan Kumar, a co-first author on this Advanced Energy Materials paper, is a nanoengineering Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Kumar and nanoengineering professor Wang are leading a team


focused on commercializing aspects of this work. The team is one of five to be selected to join a new technology accelerator at UC San Diego. The technology accelerator is run by the UC San Diego Institute for the Global Entrepreneur, which is a collaboration between the Jacobs School of Engineering and Rady School of Management. The research was sponsored by the Advanced Research


Projects Agency-Energy (DE-AR0000535) and the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. The work was performed in part at the San Diego Nanotechnol- ogy Infrastructure (SDNI), a member of the National Nano- technology Coordinated Infrastructure, which is supported by the National Science Foundation.


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Measuring and Presetting Technology www.haimer-usa.com 32 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


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