search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SME SPEAKS


next-generation workforce in developing the ability to design products that leverage the design freedoms offered by additive manufacturing processes. Sponsored by the Direct Digital Man- ufacturing Tech Group, which is part of SME’s Additive Manu- facturing Community and chaired by SME member Carl Dekker, president of Met-L-Flo Inc. (Sugar Grove, IL), this competition invites high school and university-level students to showcase their technical and commercial talents by demonstrating new and creative ways AM can add value. This competition provides both a context and an incentive for students to engage in DfAM, and has resulted in a number of novel uses of additive manufac- turing, from a printable drone that is able to inspect bridges to a prosthetic limb for dogs.


The 2017 Digital Manufacturing Challenge centered around a theme of “mobility.” The competition challenged students to design products that could restore, enhance or fundamentally alter physical mobility and/or performance in the areas of per- sonal transportation, sporting goods or medical appliances/ physical therapy devices. This year’s university-winning team was an interdisciplinary group from Virginia Tech composed of both undergraduate (Andy Cohen, mechanical engineering) and graduate students (Camden Chatham and Jake Fallon, macromolecular science and engineering, and Eric Gilmer, chemical engineering).


The team designed a “customized golf grip trainer” that aimed to allow players to practice with a proper grip without the need for a professional’s constant supervision. In their concept, the grips are first custom-fit to the player by an onsite golf professional using clay. The clay impression is then 3D scanned, converted to an STL file, 3D printed with a thermoplastic urethane (TPU) resin and delivered to the customer. The printed


grips provide the “perfect grip” during practice so that the player can commit it to muscle memory for a future game. Through their design, the team leveraged the design free-


dom offered by additive manufacturing by providing a custom- ized geometry and user interface. In addition to customizing the external surface, the team also customized the hardness of the printed grip by altering the printed infill pattern (and thus internal structure) of the part. What perhaps impressed me most was that the team did not limit themselves to commercially available material extrusion filament; instead they selected a specific TPU resin (Texin RxT70A) for this application due to its FDA ap- proval for prolonged tissue contact, its softness and durability. Recognizing that this specific TPU is commonly used in injection molding, and might be suitable for material-extrusion additive manufacturing, the team processed their own filament from purchased pellets and established the proper printing param- eters. The resulting printed parts met or exceeded the team’s design specifications of water absorption, compressive strength and storage modulus at relevant playing temperatures. Perhaps, most importantly, they found that it provided a comfortable and customized means for learning a proper golf grip. Through SME’s Digital Manufacturing Challenge, these students might just have given us all a glimpse of the next evolution of design for additive manufacturing. Their interdis- ciplinary approach to product development, which included mechanical engineers, chemical engineers and polymer scientists, enabled the concurrent design of both the product geometry and the material itself. To learn more about SME’s annual Digital Manufacturing Challenge and review the winning design entries, please visit sme.org/digital-manufacturing-challenge.


2017 SME Officers and Directors


PRESIDENT Sandra L. Bouckley, FSME, P.Eng.


PRESIDENT-ELECT


Thomas R. Kurfess, PhD, FSME, CMfgT, PE Georgia Institute of Technology


VICE PRESIDENT Mark L. Michalski MKS Instruments


TREASURER


Susan M. Smyth, PhD, FSME General Motors


SECRETARY Michael D. Packer, FSME Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company


DIRECTORS


Dean L. Bartles, PhD, FSME University of New Hampshire


Edye S. Buchanan, CMfgT Fives North American Combustion Inc.


Dianne Chong, PhD, FSME The Boeing Company (retired)


Matthew L. Hilgendorf, CMfgT Black Horse LLC


Vincent W. Howell, FSME, CMfgE Corning Inc. (retired)


Robert R. Nesbitt, CMfgE AbbVie


Ralph L. Resnick, FSME National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining America Makes


James W. Schlusemann Prosperia International LLC


Rebecca R. Taylor The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & CEO Jeffrey M. Krause


Contact SME sme.org / service@sme.org (800) 733-4763 / (313) 425-3000


14 AdvancedManufacturing.org | August 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100