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DO?


EVERY DAY, IN BIG AND SMALL WAYS, YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


WHAT WILL YOU VOLUNTEER


No matter where you live, there’s an organization that relies heavily on volunteers. Whether it is serving food one Saturday a month at a soup kitchen, helping out at your church once a week, or just showing up for a one-time project, there are plenty of ways to get involved. Need ideas? Check in with Loyola’s Alumni Relations Office to help you get started.


DONATE


Do you have a cause that’s close to your heart? Know an organization that does good work on that issue? They need your support—make a financial donation, even if it is a small one. You can even do it in honor of a loved one or in someone else’s name as a gift.


MOBILIZE Mother Teresa said “love begins at home,” and your local community is a great


place to make an impact. Rally the neighbors to clean up a local park, attend town or neighborhood meetings, drum up support for a local school—try to spot where the needs are and bring people together to address them.


BE COMPASSIONATE


You don’t need to sign up as a regular volunteer or give big financial gifts to make a difference. Lead with compassion: hold the door, say thank you, don’t honk at that driver who cut you off in traffic. Be like the Jesuits you learned from at Loyola and meet people where they are, without judgment.


SPEAK UP


Write or call your elected officials at the local, state, and national level. They’ve been elected to serve the needs of their constituents—you! Make your voice heard on issues that matter to you.


HELPING OTHERS HELPS YOUR MENTAL HEALTH


Research finds a strong correlation between volunteering and mental health, including lower rates of depression, particularly in older adults.


(Source: The Health Benefits of Volunteering, Corporation for National and Community Service)


A LONGER, HEALTHIER LIFE


Data shows that U.S. states with a higher rate of volunteering have lower mortality rates and fewer incidences of heart disease.


IN FOCUS


WINTER 2018


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