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our values play out in our professional lives,” Geroulis said. She also probes students to consider the landscape of the future. “I’m not teaching the busi- ness people of today,” she said. “I’m trying to embolden them to consider opportunities [for positive change] five years from now. They’re going to have be creative and brave in how they approach them.” In the context of marketing,


Geroulis and her students contend with global issues like environmental change, an aging population, and rising geopolitical tensions. On one recent project, her students developed marketing plans that would make use of more than 800,000 discarded life jackets from Syrian refugees’ journey to Greece. The project aims to teach refugees how to repurpose the jack- ets into handbags, iPhone cases, and backpacks, with the proceeds going back to them, their families, and hope- fully a school in Athens. Geroulis prompts students to con-


sider how macro conditions factor into what they’ll be doing as business people, pushing them from—as John F. Kennedy once put it—the comfort of opinion to the discomfort of thought. “I do that by exposing them to data and corners of the world—in my case global marketing and the global econ- omy—that balance politics and eco- nomics, capitalism and democracy, and the things that are traditionally considered paradoxical.” She’s optimistic that her business


students can tackle social justice issues while still making a profit. “You can be prosperous and help others,” Geroulis said. “The students I’ve had over the years who have done well for themselves pursued what they were most fascinated about.” But progress also comes in small moments. “It may seem benign, but what gives me the most gratification is at the end of a course when a student comes up to me and says, ‘You know, I never read current events, I was never a news hound, I never engaged with the world more broadly. And now, I do.’” L


Learning by doing


INSPIRING SERVICE AT LOYOLA isn’t limited to the classroom. The Center for Experiential Learning (CEL), which this year is celebrating its 10th anniversary, gives students a hands-on experience by taking their course- work out into the community. By collaborating with faculty, staff, and community organizations as co-educators, CEL creates courses that help students encounter the world through the lens of social justice. “Students see the world more realistically, and sometimes as more flawed,” said CEL director Patrick Green. “Being able to articulate that makes them more effective agents of change.”


2,930 102,550


840


COMMUNITY PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS HOSTED STUDENTS IN SERVICE-LEARNING, ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP, OR RESEARCH EXPERIENCES


STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN SERVICE LEARNING OVER THE COURSE OF THE YEAR


HOURS STUDENTS SPENT WORKING WITH COMMUNITY PARTNERS 96%


OF STUDENTS SAID THEY WERE ABLE TO BETTER UNDERSTAND AND APPLY ACADEMIC COURSE CONTENT TO THEIR SERVICE EXPERIENCE IN MEANINGFUL WAYS


WINTER 2018


21


PHOTO BY NATALIE BATTAGLIA


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