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FIVE QUESTIONS WITH... MAR 24


THE FOURTH ANNUAL WOMEN’S DAY CONFERENCE WILL FEATURE A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS CELEBRATING WOMEN FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE AND INSPIRING PARTICIPANTS TO ERADICATE EXISTING INEQUALITIES. THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE THEME IS “BREAKING BOUNDARIES: MOVEMENT AND MIGRATION.”


Wil Haygood


Award-winning journalist and author Wil Haygood has brought to life some of the most important stories in Amer- ican history. His most recent book, Showdown: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination That Changed America, chronicles the life of the first African American Supreme Court justice. Haygood recently visit- ed Loyola to speak to both departing students at last year’s commencement and to incoming students—who read Showdown as their first-year text—at new student convocation this fall. —Maura Sullivan Hill


APR 19


THE QUINLAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS WILL HOST A DAYLONG PROGRAM ON NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS, DESIGNED TO HELP THEM APPLY THEIR SKILLS AND LEADERSHIP SUCCESSFULLY IN THE SOCIAL SECTOR.


1


Why is Thurgood Marshall’s story so important to tell at this moment in history?


We just came through a very divisive presidential campaign, where racial minorities and women were egregiously and verbally attacked. These are the roadblocks that Thurgood Marshall always battled against, and we need his example today as much as we’ve ever needed it.


2


What do you hope freshmen learn from your book?


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS, VISIT LUC.EDU/ CALENDAR


Freedom in this country has never been free, especially for African Americans. Students need to know about Thurgood Marshall for the simple fact that


he was a patriot; he cared about voting rights, women’s rights, civil rights, and human rights. The entire spectrum of his life, his court victories, and the bat- tle to confirm him to the highest court in the land spoke of the ongoing struggle as it relates to justice in this country.


3


How can others stand up for justice in America today?


Those who want to improve upon the harsh climate have to do sev- eral things: They have to get to know people who don’t look like them, they have to vote, and they have to learn to respect people of different cultures and genders. No matter how dark the hour seems, there is light looming, and I think those who play a part in


PHOTO BY JULIA EWAN/THE WASHINGTON POST


the coming of that light will feel much better as human beings.


4


What advice would you give aspiring journalism students?


It was journalism that taught me how to tell stories. I always keep my eye on the hearts that are beating inside of the people in the stories that I write.


5


You’ve been on campus twice in the last year. What has impressed you most?


The students know the richness, the power, and the sacredness of a Jesuit education. Every time that I step on campus, I myself feel like a better human being simply for having been there.


READ THE FULL INTERVIEW AND WATCH HAYGOOD’S CONVOCATION SPEECH LUC.EDU/WILHAYGOOD


WINTER 2018


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