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2| PEOPLE’S POWERLINE


DON’T LET ELECTRICAL


HAZARDS HAUNT YOUR HALLOWEEN


H


alloween is the most festively frightening night of the year. But don’t


make yours fraught with danger. Here are some safety reminders:


• Inspect electrical decorations. Look for cracked or frayed sockets, loose or bare wires, and loose connections.


• Read manufacturer’s instructions regarding installation and maintenance. Check the instructions to see how many light strings can be connected together.


• Always unplug light strings before replacing any bulbs.


• Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, walls or other fi rm supports. Do not use nails or tacks that could puncture light strings or electrical/extension cords.


• Provide well-lit walkways and porch lighting for trick-or-treaters. Make sure the walkways are clear for trick-or-treaters.


• Don’t overload extension cords or place them near, or in, snow or water.


• Make sure electrical decorations are approved by a nationally recognized


certifi cation organization like “UL” (Underwriters Laboratory) and marked for outdoor use if you are using them outside. Check www.cpsc.gov or www. ul.com for recalls. Many Halloween toys have been recalled in the past by the CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission). 610500600


• Do not overload your circuit breakers or fuses.


• Plug lights and decorations into circuits protected by ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). Portable outdoor GFCIs can be purchased where electrical supplies are sold.


• Make sure decorative lighting is well ventilated, protected from weather and a safe distance from anything fl ammable like dry leaves and shrubs. Do not coil power cords or extension cords while in use or tuck under rugs or drapes.


• Turn out all lights and decorations before leaving or going to bed. Always have at least one fi re extinguisher available and know how to use it.


For more tips visit: www.SafeElectricity.org


or www.PeoplesElectric.coop/safety.


Halloween safety tips


1. Walk Safely • Cross the street at corners, using traffi c signals and crosswalks


• Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffi c as far to the left as possible. 293401902


2. Trick or Treat with an Adult • Children under the age of 12 should not be alone at night without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be without supervision, they should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and stay in groups.


3. Keep Costumes Creative and Safe • Decorate costumes and bags with refl ective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors.


• Have kids carry glow sticks or fl ashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers.


4. Drive Extra Safely on Halloween • Drive slowly; anticipate heavy pedestrian traffi c and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children.


• Popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.


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