search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Top left: One of the features offered by Tesla is a large flat-panel display with Google Maps that constantly shows the nearest charging stations within range. Top right: WFEC staff, Kylah McNabb, manager, commercial & industrial marketing, and Scott Williams, manager, government relations and communications, observe as Angela Hankins, special programs officer, Association of Central Oklahoma Governments (ACOG), draws a card at the start of the Electric Vehicle Poker Run. After completing the five stops along the EV poker run route, Hankins was the overall winner.


W


Story and photos by James Pratt


estern Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC) sponsored the first ever Oklahoma Electric Vehicle Poker Run on a sunny Friday in September in the Oklahoma City metro area. The gathering of cutting-edge automotive technology was replete


with Teslas, Chevy Bolts, a Fiat 500, and a Nissan Leaf. As part of National Drive Electric Week, the event was designed to show- case the expanding electric vehicle market and the infrastructure needed to support it. The poker run took drivers on an 80-mile loop of the Oklahoma City metro area, with stops at various EV infrastructure spots in the area. The event began at WFEC’s Moore Office. There participants drew a poker card from a bucket for the start of their poker hand. Hot dogs and refreshments were available; industry executives were there to answer ques- tions and interact with participants. “We work with businesses to install electric charging stations,” says Matt Ellis with Francis Solar. “We help them with financing, tax credits, and in- stallation. Many businesses are installing EV charging stations to attract customers.” One such business is the fast-growing convenience store chain OnCue Express. Scott Minton, director of business development, explained that OnCue now has two charging stations in the Oklahoma City metro area— one in Yukon and one at their new Edmond location on I-35 and Waterloo. While electric vehicle sales are growing exponentially, there are still


hurdles that need to be addressed for wide-scale deployment. One challenge is the variety of plug standards found in EV vehicles. The charging station at OnCue, for example, has two charging “hoses” with different electrical plugs. This is because there are three different plug-in sockets for different makes of cars. The two “hoses” at the OnCue charging station cover most of the current electric vehicles on the market today, with the notable excep- tion of the Tesla. “Tesla has their own proprietary charging receptacle,” WFEC Vice President of Member Relations, Mark Faulkenberry, says. “This allows for very fast charging at one of Tesla’s 11,000 Supercharger stations, but Tesla owners will need to use an included adapter to connect their Tesla to a standard EV charging station, which does not charge quite as fast as Tesla’s own Supercharger stations.” While the charging infrastructure is rapidly growing in the United States,


technology also helps EV owners keep their vehicles charged. There are a number of phone apps drivers can use to show the location and distance to public charging stations. And as cars like the Tesla and Bolt expand their driving range, these apps allow drivers to plan their route across country, making sure charging is available along the route. WFEC’s sponsored Poker Run was designed to highlight EV growth and raise awareness for the challenges—and opportunities—ahead. And at the end of the poker run, the winner of the $250 gift card was Angela Hankins, special programs officer, Association of Central Oklahoma Governments.


OCTOBER 2018 9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112