search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Keep Electrical Spooks From


Haunting Your Halloween More and more people decorate their yards for Halloween


with elaborate lighting displays with as much enthusiasm and as many materials as they do for the Christmas holidays. Strings of decorative lights, fog machines, strobe and black lights, animatronics, and electrically powered decorations all add to the ambience of Halloween, but improperly used, can create added dangers of fire, shock, and other potentially disastrous accidents.


Safe Electricity urges everyone to use caution and look for


potential hazards while decorating and operating these displays. “Tese decorations have been packed away since last year


in basements, garages and sheds,” says Molly Hall, executive director of the Safe Electricity program. “Weather, time and even mice can damage cords and insulation on electric decorations, making them unsafe. Make sure you discard any damaged sets and buy new.”


Safe Electricity offers these tips:


t Carefully inspect each electrical decoration. Cracking, fraying, or bare wires may cause a serious shock or start a fire. Replace any damaged products.


t Before using any light strings, animated displays, or other electrical products outdoors, make sure the product is approved by a nationally recognized certification organization such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL) and marked for outdoor use.


t Follow the use and care instructions that accompany your electrical decorations.


t Don’t overload extension cords or allow them to run through water on the ground. Typically, one extension cord should only have three strands of lights connected to it at most, but you should also check that the extension cord is rated for its intended use.


t Plug outdoor electric lights and decorations into outlets protected by ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). If your outdoor outlets don’t have them, either contact a qualified electrician to install them or use portable GFCIs instead.


t When decorating outside, always be sure to look up and double check that you and any equipment, such as a ladder or a light strand, are a minimum 10 feet away from overhead power lines. When securing light strands, never staple or nail them into place. Tis could damage the product.


t Keep electrical cords out of walkway areas to avoid causing a tripping hazard.


t Lastly, turn off all electrical light strings and decorations before leaving home or going to sleep. A timer can help you do this.


Avoid real scares this Halloween, and decorate safely. Get more safety tips at SafeElectricity.org. NO. OF OUTAGES


MONTHLY OUTAGE REPORT CAUSE OF OUTAGE


Animal Lightning Unknown Tractor tore line down Backhoe tore phase down Plow cut line Wind


)RU WKH PRQWK RI $XJXVW +DUPRQ (OHFWULF H[SHULHQFHG VHSDUDWH RXWDJHV 7KH WRWDO PHPEHUV DIIHFWHG ZHUH ZLWK DQ DYHUDJH WLPH RII RI


KRXUV


NO. OF METERS AFFECTED


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112