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HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES - Lisa Richard, Editor


The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Aaron Paxton..........General Manager/CEO


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter.....................................................District 1 Jim Reeves.......................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman..................................................District 3 Braden Cunningham........................................District 4 Burk Bullington.................................................District 5 Jean Pence......................................................District 6 J. R. Conley......................................................District 7


Monthly Board of Directors meetings Held Fourth Thursday of Each Month


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch servicemen. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, FDOO RXU RI¿FH DW


$Q\ RWKHU H[FKDQJH DUHD FDOO WROO IUHH


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


Hidden Account Number Worth $50.00


DFFRXQW QXPEHU


Mark Evans failed to locate his hidden ZKLFK ZDV ORFDWHG


in the “Lighting Labels and Lingo” article RQ WKH WKLUG SDJH RI WKH 6HSWHPEHU Harmon Hi-Lites. The hidden account QXPEHU IRU 2FWREHU


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Remember the contest rules as you search your “Harmon Hi-Lites.” 1. The hidden account number must be your own. Find the account number somewhere in the newsletter and compare the number listed in the lower left corner of your power bill in the Master Account area, if same it is your number. 2. Your number must be reported by the 12th of the same month of publication of the newsletter. 3. You must report your own number to the


DVVRFLDWLRQ¶V KHDGTXDUWHUV RI¿FH LQ +ROOLV Oklahoma by phone, mail or in person. 4. Money will accumulate at the rate of $10.00 per month until the number is found or until January 1, 2019.


Aaron Paxton, General Manager/CEO


Dramatic changes are transforming all aspects of the energy industry. Interest in renewable energy is at an all-time high, and ultimately consumers want greater control over their energy use and payment methods. The prevalence of smart-phone apps and “smart” technology for the home is increasing, and consumers and businesses are showing greater interest in electric vehicles.


There’s no denying it: electric utilities will have to make changes to the way they provide energy to accommodate these trends. Luckily, Harmon Electric Association is uniquely positioned to meet these changing energy needs because we are a cooperative.


October is National Co-op Month, which is the perfect time to highlight the many ways electric cooperatives are unique. Cooperatives are locally governed, looking out for the long-term needs of their consumer-members. 121200


Electric cooperatives belong to the communities they serve. This heightened community focus allows us to quickly adapt to evolving consumer expectations. Our closeness to the community ensures a better response to these needs because we are led by the people that we serve.


Electric co-ops, like Harmon Electric, are a catalyst for good in their communities. Co-ops engage their consumer-members to do things that might RWKHUZLVH EH LPSRVVLEOH RU GLIÀFXOW OLNH PRUH WKDQ \HDUV DJR ZKHQ HOHFWULF FR RSV EURXJKW SRZHU WR DUHDV ZKHUH RWKHU XWLOLWLHV GLG QRW ÀQG LW HFRQRPLFDOO\ feasible.


Cooperatives exist to meet a need that was previously unmet in the community, and they are ever striving to anticipate and plan for the future needs of their consumer-members. Electric cooperatives often partner with local groups to bring economic opportunity to their local community. It is this facilitation role that is often the most valuable strength of the co-op.


The co-op business model is unique. It is pragmatic, mission-oriented and SXWV SHRSOH ÀUVW &R RSV VWULYH WR EH D WUXVWHG YRLFH LQ WKHLU FRPPXQLWLHV &R ops have earned that trust because, while not perfect, they always have their members’ best interest at heart and are determined to enrich the lives of those living and working in the communities they serve - now and in the future.


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