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c ommenta r y BOARD OF TRUSTEES


David Ray, President DISTRICT 4


Don Parr, Vice President DISTRICT 5


Mark Ichord, Secretary-Treasurer DISTRICT 6


MEMBERS Russell Shaw


Richard Medlock Ron Pelanconi Larry Culwell


Brett Orme Executive Vice President-CEO


Kiamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC) is committed to providing reliable and affordable electric service to members in Latimer, LeFlore, Pittsburg, Pushmataha and Atoka counties.


The people and businesses that purchase electricity from Kiamichi Electric are considered member-owners of the co-op. Each member—regardless of how much electricity they purchase – has an equal say in how the cooperative is operated.


To exercise their right, Kiamichi Electric members are encouraged to attend co-op meetings and vote in co-op elections.


Kiamichi Electric service territory is divided into seven districts. Members within each district meet every two years to choose a fellow member to represent their interests on the Kiamichi Electric board of trustees. KEC board members set policy and oversee cooperative business.


Through local leadership and control, Kiamichi Electric Cooperative members can rest assured their electric co-op remains focused on the needs of its members and its rural communities.


DISTRICT 1 DISTRICT 2 DISTRICT 3 DISTRICT 7


you ever look at your energy bill and wonder what it all means? If your answer to that question is “yes,” then you might be interested to learn how demand impacts your utility bill.


Y


To start, it is important to understand how electricity is made and how it is delivered to your home.


Before Kiamichi Electric can send electricity to your home, that electricity needs to be generated by a generation and transmission cooperative (G&T). Once the electricity has been generated, it travels over high-voltage transmission lines to substations, where the voltage is reduced to a safer level. The electricity then travels over distribution power lines and finds its way into your home. So, while you pay your bill to us – your electric distribution cooperative – we don’t actually generate the electricity you use. That's the job of the G&T.


We do help to determine how much electricity our members need to power their homes and businesses, and you play a big part in determining how much electricity the G&T needs to create in order to keep the lights on in our community. That is where these terms “consumption” and “demand” come in.


ope ra t i on roundup


Monthly Financial Report YEAR TO DATE COLLECTIONS:


YEAR TO DATE DISBURSEMENTS: TOTAL COLLECTED SINCE INCEPTION:


TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS SINCE INCEPTION:


$ 53,756 $ 36,274


$ 1,420,197 $1,321,976


Operation Roundup is a voluntary bill roundup program that benefits southeast Oklahoma communities, organizations and needy families. Applications for funds are available at Kiamichi Electric, local social services , or online at www.kiamichielectric.org.


2 | september - october 2017 | Light Post


Understanding Energy Demand A penny's worth of electricit provides plent of value


ou may not think you need to have an understanding of energy demand and purchasing, but do


By Brett Orme CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Consumption is measured in kilowatt hours (kwh). Demand is measured in kilowatts (kW). A lightbulb “consumes” a certain number of watts, let’s say 100 watts per hour. If that lightbulb stays on for 10 hours, it “demands” a certain number of kilowatts (in this case, 1 kW) from the generation station producing electricity. Now, if you turn on 10, 100-watt lightbulbs in your home for one hour, you are still consuming the same number of kW. However, you are placing a demand on the utility to have those kW available to you over the course of one hour, instead of ten. This requires the generation and


transmission plant to produce more power in less time in order to meet your demand.


Kiamichi Electric purchases kilowatt hours from the G&T based on the average demand of our members. Peak demand refers to the time of day when the demand for electricity is highest. This is typically during the evening when families return home from work or school, cook dinner and use appliances the most. Using electricity during this peak demand period often costs more to both Kiamichi Electric and our members.


Demand is the reason your bill often fluctuates. Generating and distributing power can be complicated, but your co- op will always meet your demand for safe, reliable and affordable electricity.


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