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safety first


Safety on the Farm Tips for working near power lines


A


great deal of farm work takes place around power lines


and sometimes the push to get the work done can lead to tragic outcomes.


“The things people see every day can fade from view so it’s easy for farmers and their employees to forget about the power lines overhead,” says Rich- ard McCracken of the Safe Electricity Advisory Board. “But fail- ure to notice them can be a deadly oversight.”


• To stay stafe, review with all the farm activities that take place around power lines and go after these safety tips with your employees.


• Keep equipment at least 10 feet away from power lines – above, below and to the side – a 360-degree rule. Inspect the height of farm equipment to deter- mine clearance.


• Use care when raising augers or the bed of grain trucks around power lines.





Use a spotter when oper- ating large machinery near power lines. Don’t let the spotter touch the machinery while it is being moved anywhere near power lines.





Be careful not to raise equipment such as lad- ders or poles into power lines. Non-metallic mate- rials such as lumber, tree limbs, ropes and hay will conduct electricity depending on dampness, dust and dirt contamina- tion.


4 • October 2017 • The Cooperator


• Never attempt to raise or move a power line to clear a path.





Don’t use metal poles to break up bridged grain inside bins. Know where and how to shut off the power in an emergency.





Use qualified electricians for work on drying equipment and other farm electrical systems.


• Know what to do if your vehicle or equipment comes in contact with a power line: Stay on the equipment, warn others to stay away and call 911. Do not get off the equip- ment until the utility crew says it is safe to do so.


• Make sure farm employ- ees are informed of elec- trical hazards and trained in proper procedures to avoid injury.


If you have questions about farm electrical safety, please call KEC at 800-535-1079. For more tips, please visit www. SafeElectricity.org.


PUMPKIN PATCH 22


OPENING SEPTEMBER 5PM THROUGH OCTOBER Let your best memories be made


on the farm or in the barn and don't forget to make hay when


the sun is shinin'. -Grdpa


MONDAY Closed TUESDAY Appointment only WEDNESDAY Appointment only THURSDAY 10am to 6pm FRIDAY 10am to 6pm SATURDAY 10am to 6pm SUNDAY 1pm to 6pm


JUST 4 MILES NORTH OF LAMONT


105340 GREER RD. LAMONT, OK 580•716•3608


RusticRootsEvents.com @RusticRootsEvents


No Bake Peanut Butter Pie Contributed by Anita Denney, Newkirk


INGREDIENTS


1 8 oz. pkg cream cheese 1 ½ cup powdered sugar 1 cup creamy peanut butter 1 tsp vanilla 1 cup milk ½ to 1 tub Cool Whip 1 graham cracker crust 1 T. chopped salted peanuts


DIRECTIONS


In a mixing bowl, combine cream cheese and sugar. Beat at medium speed until smooth.


Add peanut butter, milk and vanilla. Mix well. Fold in Cool Whip.


Spoon mixture into crust and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Chill 3 hours before serving. HIDDEN ACCT#1324000


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