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co-op values Vampire Loads


Don’t let them drain your energy.


The little vampires who ring


your doorbell on


Halloween aren’t the only ones you should be afraid of. Electricity vampires are lurking all over your house—all year long.


KEC Salutes Co-op Month Commitment to Community is reason to celebrate


ay Electric Cooperative is joining 30,000 cooperatives nationwide in October to celebrate National Co-op Month, which recognizes the many ways cooperatives are committed to strengthening the local communities they serve. “Co-ops Commit” is the theme for this year’s celebration, spotlighting the ways cooperatives meet the needs of their members and communities.


K


“Delivering safe, reliable, affordable power is Kay Electric’s top priority,”said Tim Rodriguez, CEO of the co-op. “But we are also invested in our communities because we are locally owned and operated. Reve- nue generated by Kay Electric helps Main Street, not Wall Street.”


Rural America is served by a network of about 1,000 electric cooperatives, most of which were formed in the 1930s and 40s to bring electricity to farms and rural communities that investor-owned power companies ignored due to higher costs involved in serving low-population and low-density areas.


In addition to providing the vital power co-op members depend on, Kay Electric provides leadership opportunities for teens through programs such as Youth Tour and Cooperative leadership Camp, promotes energy savings through rebates on heat pumps and water heaters, and makes grants available to local organizations through its K-Up Foundation.


Community Grants grants


Cont’d from page 2 Foundation


primarily to the will be following


awarded projects


and organizations: Programs, projects and organizations that are important components of a community’s overall quality of life, with emphasis on public safety, health care, senior citizens affiliated organization and projects, self-sufficiency, and basic human needs. Educational, youth programs and volunteer fire departments will also be considered for grants. All applicants need to reside in KEC’s five county service territory: Garfield, Grant,


Electrical vampires are appliances and electronics that continue to pull electricity, even when they are turned off.


According to the US Department of Energy, vampires account for up to 5 percent of the energy in your house.


To save you from a witch hunt, here is a list of the most likely vampires in your house:


• Computers, modems, routers, printers and other related equip- ment.


• Your flat-screen TV. The larger it is, the more energy it uses, even when turned off.


• Home theater equipment,


including surround-sound devices.


• Your cable or satellite TV box. • Anything with a digital


Kay, Noble, and Osage Counties. KECF is collecting around $2,400 a month from its members and employees to fund the grants.


Applications for 2017 fourth-quarter grants are due October 2, 2017. Download pro- gram details and applications at http:// www.kayelectric.coop/content/founda- tion.


To visit with Kay Electric representative about the K-Up Foundation, please call 800-535-1079.


time


display, like your microwave oven or DVD player.


If an electrical device has a continuous display, such as a digital clock, charges batteries, or has a remote control, such as your TV—it’s a vampire.


The best way to stop these vampires is to unplug them when you’re not using them. You may also consider purchas- ing power strips so you have to pull just one plug to stop a group of elec- tronics from using vampire electricity.


The Cooperator • October 2017 • 3


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