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currents Use SmartHub To


Help You Save Consumers who understand their energy use patterns tend to use less and as a result, enjoy lower monthly bills. That’s one of the ways you can use SmartHub to help you save. An even easier way is to sign up for SmartHub usage alerts.


When you sign up for usage alerts, you set a daily usage threshold that will help you save. When you pass the threshold, SmartHub will issue an alert the following morning based on your preferred method of contact— text , email or both.


SmartHub usage alerts help you monitor your behavior and set reasonable energy saving goals. Make it challenging by seeing how low you can go. Get the kids involved and the family will be on the road to better energy habits.


To set up usage alerts, you'll need to use the web version of SmartHub. Follow the SmartHub link available at www.ecoec.com.


If you'd like help setting up SmartHub usage alerts, please call your co-op at 918-756-0833.


Connect with Your


Co-op on Twitter Stay connected with your co-op by following our Twitter feed @ EastCentralElec. You'll appreciate storm and


outage updates, energy saving tips to help you lower your electric bill, and other helpful information.


You can also follow us on Twitter by visiting www.ecoec.com and clicking on the Twitter icon at the upper right of our home page. We'll tweet with you soon!


2 | OCTOBER 2017 | country living


ECE Salutes Co-op Month Commitment to local communities is reason to celebrate!


October to celebrate National Co-op Month, which recognizes the many ways cooperatives are committed to strengthening the local communities they serve. “Co-ops Commit” is the theme for this year’s celebration, spotlighting the ways cooperatives meet the needs of their members and communities.


E


“Delivering safe, reliable, affordable power is East Central Electric’s top priority,” said Tim Smith, general manager. “But we are also invested in our communities because we are locally owned and operated. Revenue generated by the cooperative helps Main Street, not Wall Street.”


Rural America is served by a network of about 1,000 electric cooperatives, most of which were formed in the 1930s


ast Central Electric Cooperative (ECE) is joining 30,000 cooperatives nationwide in


and 40s to bring electricity to farms and rural communities that investor- owned power companies ignored due to higher costs involved in serving low- population and low-density areas.


In addition to providing the vital power co-op members depend on, ECE provides opportunities for teens through programs such as Youth Tour and Operation Roundup college scholarships. Member donations to Operation Roundup provide thousands of dollars in grants each year to local organizations and charities. The co-op also offers an energy education curriculum for local schools and offers members energy saving services that include cash rebates on heat pumps and water heaters and free home energy audits.


For information on ECE services and other ways it commits to local communities, please call 918-756-0833 or visit www.ecoec.com.


co-opvalue


ELECTRICAL SAFETY


TIP OF THE MONTH Understand your home's electrical system. Make a map showing which fuse or circuit breaker controls each switch, light or outlet.


SOURCE: ELECTRICAL SAFETY FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL


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