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PAGE 2 | LIVEWIRE | OCTOBER 2017


CEO VIEW Continued from page 1


We understand the spirit that helped create this co-op must be continually nurtured. While times and technology will continue to change, our commitment to you will not.


Although we started out to provide electricity, our impact (with your support) has grown.


As we continue to look toward the future, you can be confident that TCEC will commit to explore new ways to help our members and our community. For example, TCEC was the first utility in Oklahoma to launch Community Solar where members can be part of renewable energy in an affordable way. TCEC also supports local schools with annual donations, which will be presented this month. Local fire departments, ambulance services and emergency management services will also receive support from TCEC. Concern for Community is the Seventh Cooperative Principle and we feel it is important to stay true to that.


Over the years, as we’ve listened to you and your fellow co-op member- owners, we know that we have to keep pace as technology and consumer tastes evolve. As always, we welcome your participation as we plan for the future. The Town Halls mentioned on page one are one of many ways we offer to participate in TCEC. n


TCEC personnel help restore power after Hurricane Irma


Hurricane Irma was a historic storm and utilities are


coordinating a historic response. Approximately 5,000 cooperative workers from 25 states are converging on the hurricane’s impact zone to assist with restoration efforts. Affected co- ops took steps ahead of Irma’s landfall to prepare for restoration and those steps are helping to speed the process of reconnecting members to the grid.


At the request of Excelsior EMC, in Metter, Georgia, ten linemen and one mechanic from TCEC joined with crews from six other electric cooperatives in Oklahoma on Friday, September 8, to go to a staging area and prepare to assist with power restoration.


“Our thoughts and prayers are


TCEC CREWS WORKING IN GEORGIA FOLLOWING HURRICANE IRMA.


with those in the Southeast who are recovering from Hurricane Irma,” said TCEC Chief Executive Officer Zac Perkins. “We are also thinking of our linemen and their families while they are away.”


Electric cooperatives took a direct hit from the storm, and expect to be working to restore power for days or weeks. Peak outage estimates indicate that there were 760,000 co-op outages in Florida, 535,000 in Georgia, and 100,000 in South Carolina. The crew from TCEC will not return home until around September 22.


Co-ops restored power to more than 500,000 meters on September 12. They are working around the clock and making remarkable progress as they work to restore power in the wake of this catastrophic storm. Outage estimates as of September 13 at 10 a.m. Eastern are: 424,000 in Florida, 210,000 in Georgia, and 10,000 in South Carolina. These decreasing outage numbers highlight the resilience, preparedness and collaboration of electric cooperatives.


Visit www.tcec.coop or call 580.652.2418 for more information. n This article was originally issued as a news release on September 13, 2017.


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


Spending more time in the kitchen during the holiday season? Here’s one way to be more energy efficient: Unplug small kitchen appliances, like toaster ovens and microwaves, when not in use. You could save $10 to $20 per year.


Source: U.S. Dept. of Energy


Electrical Safety Tip of the Month


If a power line falls on your vehicle and there is NO fire, your safest option is to stay inside. Call 911 or TCEC for help. If there IS a fire, you should leave your vehicle. To exit safely, jump out of the vehicle, landing with both feet together, and making sure no part of your body or clothing touches the ground and vehicle at the same time. Then shuffle at least 40 feet away.


Source: NRECA


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