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is through conversions – converting fabricated or other parts to castings. Te other way is through reshoring – by bringing back work that has been offshored to Asia or Europe. AFS is committed to helping foundries pursue both strategies. At the Congress, Reshoring Initia-


tive Founder Harry Moser addressed more than 400 attendees, a likely record for Metalcasting Congress key- note speaker, providing specific instruc- tions and inspiration on how to win back business from Asia and Europe by demonstrating economic realities. “Foundries can convince their custom- ers that even though the price may be higher in the U.S., the total cost might be lower,” Moser said. Te discussion continued into


Moser’s free afternoon workshop with highly engaged attendees. To further help AFS members pursue reshoring, Moser has agreed to work with the AFS Marketing Committee to create webinars that will provide more infor- mation as a follow-up.


Student Engagement to Shape the Future Workforce


Students, who are the future of the


industry, played a prominent role in the first-ever unified AFS Hub experience on the show floor. Foundry Education Foundation (FEF) student volunteers from Kent State University oversaw 150 castings made with Foundry in a Box.


Now-Immediate Past President Jeff Cook, left, and new AFS President Patricio Gil hold the ceremonial rammer during an event at the Metalcasting Congress in Milwaukee.


FEF student chapters learned from successful industry professionals, such as AFS President Jeff Cook (Eagle Alloy) who hosted a candid town hall discussion with student chapter leaders. Another group, Future Leaders


of Metalcasting (FLM) saw a large turnout of more than 60 young profes- sionals gathering for roundtable discus- sions to equip them with tools for the challenges facing the next generation of metalcasters.


Talent Development and Education


Tose registered with Exhibits and Education passes had access to 2.5 days


of technical and management sessions covering the business of metalcasting, engineering and technology, casting design and purchasing, nonferrous and ferrous alloys, molding processes, environmental health and safety, and professional development. Te AFS Institute offered four


well-attended short-format courses on Casting Material Properties, Iden- tifying the Correct Casting Defect, Virtual Casting Process, and Building Positive Buzz: Intentionally Shaping Your Reputation Trough Emotional Intelligence. For the fourth year in a row, the


The show floor was filled with booths and interaction during last month's Metalcasting Congress in Milwaukee.


Women in Metalcasting shared interest group held an event, with participa- tion steadily building off the inaugural breakfast. Te shared interest group is a platform for women in the industry to develop avenues for networking, mentorship and the sharing of ideas, experiences, and best practices. Tis year, 100 women met over breakfast and discussed topics including personal branding, management skills, govern- ment affairs, and conflict resolution. WIM also cosponsored an Institute educational course. Other networking events included the Division Recognition Luncheon, President’s Luncheon, Alumni Din- ner and Copper Luncheon. AFS was pleased to welcome back many past presidents, including Burleigh Jacobs,


May 2017 MODERN CASTING | 41


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