This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BACKGROUND ON THE


automotive customers, Autodesk sought to make samples of parts produced in the generatively-designed lattice structure and calculate the potential savings, which led to Aristo-Cast. “I had been researching the casting


space for a little over a year and it became clear Aristo-Cast was a pretty unique operation and experience with the level of complexity we were inter- ested in,” said Andreas Bastian, prin- cipal research scientist for Autodesk. “Tey work with magnesium, which was very interesting to us because it is about 35% lighter than aluminum and can’t yet be printed, so that was an added value.” Aristo-Cast is one of fewer than


10 investment casting facilities in the world that regularly casts magnesium.


CASTING OF THE YEAR COMPETITION


Te annual Casting of the Year competition is sponsored by the American Foundry Society and Metal Casting Design & Purchasing magazine and recognizes excellence in casting design. Te competition is open to all North American metalcasters and designers/end-users of metal castings. Castings are accepted in all metals, casting process, end-use applications and sizes.


Independent judges evaluate each entry on: • Benefits delivered to the casting customer. • The use of the casting process’ unique capabilities. • Contribution to growth and expansion of the casting market.


Although the lattice structure in aluminum will also achieve weight and costs savings, creating it in magnesium multiplies the savings significantly.


“Autodesk was looking for samples


and we have learned a lot throughout the years about how to gate mag- nesium versus aluminum,” said Paul


26 | MODERN CASTING May 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68