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ROOT CAUSE of Metalcasting Injuries


Assessing the Unsafe acts are seldom the root cause of industrial injuries, and a deeper


analysis of potential underlying causes is needed. TED J. SCHORN, ENKEI AMERICA INC. (COLUMBUS, INDIANA)


T


he metalcasting industry continues to be chal- lenged with higher injury rates than other manu-


facturing organizations, and this has been true for many years. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statis- tics, foundry injury rates have been and continue to be much more than those for all private manufacturing (Figs. 1-2). This continuing disparity in


injury rates should create a strong


motivation to focus on injury pre- vention and the institution of mea- sures designed to reduce foundry injury rates and the human suffering that these rates represent. In a search for the cause of


industrial injuries, it is common to cite the highly influential and groundbreaking work of pioneer- ing safety scientist Herbert William Heinrich. Heinrich’s work, Indus- trial Accident Prevention: A Scientific Approach, first published in 1931,


Several structural elements can influence worker safety behavior, including the


environment, process layout, documented method, available process time, tools provided to the worker and type and nature of the PPE provided.


would become the foundation for safety science over at least the next 50 years. Five editions of the book were published by McGraw Hill, the latest in 1980. Heinrich’s work, while not in


print today, continues to influence the thinking of modern safety pro- fessionals and plant managers. His work is often remembered for two fundamental concepts: the ratio of causation of injuries between unsafe acts and unsafe conditions and his accident pyramid, expressing a statistical likelihood of minor safety events to major events. Heinrich’s own view was accident


prevention should focus on man failures and employ psychological methodologies to reduce industrial injuries. Heinrich wrote, “In the occurrence of accidental injury, it is apparent that man failure is the heart of the problem; equally appar- ent is the conclusion that methods of control must be directed toward man failure.”


The perspective that human error, June 2017 MODERN CASTING | 23


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