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Fig. 7. The standard vertical filter print with slag trap is depicted.


Also, due to the steep angle of the


filter print outlet, the flow is launched upward, thus adversely influencing the stability of the flow downstream. Tis


Fig. 8. Shown is the flow comparison for standard vertical filter print with and without slag trap at 7.0% filled.


can be seen more clearly in Figure 6. It shows a top view of a cross section taken near the bottom of the run- ner bar, just after the filter print. For


the reduced area filter print design, note that the flow at both sides of the runner bar are moving very slowly, and most importantly, in the opposite direction of the intended flow. Te upward thrust of the metal flow due to the steep angle has created a large, adverse eddy current driving the flow slowly backwards. Tis situation exists for the bottom third of this runner bar. Te standard filter print design shows an area of slow flow near the bottom of the runner on one side, but the primary flow characteristics are much more uniform in velocity and direction.


Fig. 9. This is the flow comparison for standard vertical filter print with and without slag trap at 8.5% filled.


Vertical Filter Print With Slag Trap Example


Figure 7 shows the standard con-


Fig. 10. This is the flow comparison for standard vertical filter print with and without slag trap at 9.0% filled.


figuration with an addition of a slag trap before the filter. Tis change only adds approximately 0.5lbs (0.23 kgs) to the filter print design but improves the overall flow characteris- tics of the filter print itself. Te filter print with a properly designed slag trap displays the high- quality flow characteristics shown in the standard filter print, with the added benefit of better filter print inlet flow and potentially better filtration effi- ciency. Tis can be seen in Figure 8. Note that the bottom of the filter print


inlet has filled quickly and the flow is washing the filter inlet face and moving upwards into the slag trap area. At 8.5% Figure 9, the flow is nearly


Fig. 11. A flow comparison for standard vertical filter print with and without slag trap at 10.0% filled is depicted.


38 | MODERN CASTING August 2017


stabilized and the slag trap is forcing the initial metal into a beneficial counter- clockwise eddy current, thus potentially allowing inclusions to reverse direction and slowly float upward into the trap. Te standard filter print without the slag trap also has a small area of beneficial eddy currents at the top of the filter print inlet, but very little space to trap and retain inclusions. By 9% filled (Figure 10), the filter


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