search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Each casting is half of a complete rotation. The first vanes on each half must be machined to marry up when assembled, so good dimenstional stability is needed.


peel away, causing the part to be scrapped. Another downfall to the corebox method was the rotation was not interchangeable. Te corebox was only good for either clockwise or counter clockwise rotation. As demand increased and new throat sizes were needed, it became apparent Elliott needed new ways to develop the cores in a more efficient and consistent manner. One of these new methods incor-


porated an aluminum corebox with loose pieces to accommodate several different vane lengths. Te handle for indexing the spacer was replaced by a series of 48 loose pieces to set the spacing and angle. Each of the loose pieces was numbered so they could be placed in defined positions to allow for the 180-degree bend in the core. Tis method represented an improvement but still had several flaws. Te possibility the loose pieces could shift slightly remained, which would cause the spacing and angle to be off. Te loose pieces were dropped in from the top of the core and could not be locked in place. Tis was still largely a manual process that required the core maker to be precise. If they packed the sand too


28 | MODERN CASTING August 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60