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O


sco Industries (Ports- mouth, Ohio), has carved a niche for itself as one of the few


remaining medium-to-high-volume iron casting facilities pouring only gray iron in the U.S. Te commitment to gray iron seems to go against industry forecasts for growth and market share. But gray iron is the key to one of Osco’s main advan- tages: four-week lead times. Tom Kayser, sales and marketing


manager at Osco, admits ductile iron is the main growth market for the iron casting industry. But for the former Ohio Stove Co., gray iron has been provid- ing enough growth to keep the business financially strong, and opportunity in the metal remains for casters who offer good customer service and dependability. “Other foundries are dropping


their gray for ductile because it’s a growing market,” he said. “But that’s pushing more gray work our way. And


Coremaking, patternmaking, and heat treating are all done at the Portsmouth, Ohio, plant. Cored work is typically kept in Portsmouth while the New Boston facility churns through the non-cored work.


August 2017 MODERN CASTING | 17


by only pouring gray, we don’t have to worry about saying to a customer we can’t make your parts because we are pouring ductile this week. It allows us to be more flexible.”


Osco started as a stove company


in 1872. It was purchased in 1942, and immediately, stove business was dropped in favor of commercial cast- ings. Today, Osco runs out of three


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