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companion, also supports activities to raise awareness. In September its Office of Ecumenical Relations and the ELCA convened a consultation called “Countering Human Trafficking with Human Dignity in Asia Today” in Bangkok, Thailand. The event drew 59 people from Lutheran churches in Southeast Asia and the U.S.; Catholic churches, groups and charities; the Evangelical Fellowship of Thailand; the Foundation of the Seventh- Day Adventist Churches of Thailand; and nongovernmental organizations. Attendees issued a statement


titled “Mission of the Church to Prevent and Address Human Trafficking.” The document named trafficking as a “global, borderless crime against humanity that is prevailing inevitably in all societies.” The document also


acknowledged the millions of people worldwide subjected to human trafficking in factories, agribusinesses, home services, sexual trades and other businesses. An estimated 3 million people


per year from Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia and other countries are victims of human trafficking in Thailand. The work done in Thailand by the CCT Office of Ecumenical Relations, NLCF and other organizations is vital, the document said, as the nation is “a country of origin, transit and destination of human trafficking.”


Karris Golden is a writer-editor and member of Bethlehem Lutheran Church,


Cedar Falls, Iowa. She writes a weekly faith and


values column for The Courier.


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