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From The Editor
WHAT DOES ‘RETRO’ MEAN TO YOU?
By Jayme McGuire
 


In our planning meetings for this issue,  we debated what defined something as “retro.” You see, for some of our readers, the early 2000s seem like a long time ago but for others, the 1970s or ‘80s are truly ‘retro.’ In the end, we concluded that it’s all relative and invited our readers to submit whatever images they deemed “retro.”
Our cover features one image that we can all agree is both a throwback and iconic capture. Rich Cruse’s image was taken during the 1989 IRONMAN World Championship, a race dubbed the “Iron War” for the race within a race featuring USA Triathlon Hall-of-Famers and triathlon legends, Mark Allen and Dave Scott. Cruse captured the shot from a race motorcycle in only his second year covering the event. To read more about his perspective, visit bit.ly/cruseblog.


The Scott/Allen shot is a backdrop for a mosaic of over 1,100 unique images. Many of our readers submitted images in response to our social media callouts.


In addition, we pulled from the USA Triathlon archives. A special thanks to Mike Plant of Trihistory.com, who also provided several images.


Be sure to visit our Facebook page and tag yourself if you see your image on the cover.


Throughout this issue, we revisit training, nutrition and strength topics from the sport’s early days. Though triathlon has advanced on numerous fronts in 43 years, some key workouts still hold plenty of value. Read more starting on page 24 and be sure to show us your favorite throwbacks on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram by tagging @usatriathlon.


 


Jayme McGuire is USA Triathlon’s Senior Manager of Magazine & Digital Media. Contact her at jayme@usatriathlon.org.
 


 


 


 


MAILBAG
Something to say about USA Triathlon Magazine? Email letters to the editor to communications@usatriathlon.org with “mailbag” in the subject line. Be sure to include your name. Letters may be edited for length and grammar.
 


MORE AQUABIKE, PLEASE
Dear Editors,


I have recently read about the need to increase the outreach of triathlon to promote new participants. Perhaps the participation numbers are flat because some athletes have been forced to give up triathlon because they can no longer run because of injury. I have recently faced that same scenario myself after enjoying the sport of triathlon for the past 12 years. This loss was especially devastating for me because I credit the sport with helping me to maintain my weight after losing over 140 pounds in 2004. That leads me to my new-found endurance sport outlet — aquabike. Since aquabike is a triathlon without the run, it seems like the natural progression for me since I must remove running from my training and racing. I was also encouraged when I saw that USA Triathlon held a National Championship race for aquabike. Let’s get the word out that aquabike is an endurance sport for those of us who must give up the last leg of the triathlon.


— Jeff Lessenberry, Greenville, South Carolina



Editor’s note: For more information on aquabike, visit www.usatriathlon.org/disciplines. In addition to aquabike, you can find more information about duathlon, aquathlon, off-road triathlon and winter triathlon. Find races in your area on our calendar at www.usatriathlon.org/eventcalendar.


18 | USA TRIATHLON | WINTER 2018

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