search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HOW I GOT HERE A closer look at a MOAA member’s journey.


From Bomber to Balloonist MAJ. GEN. DAVID EICHHORN,


USAF (RET) F 1972


Eichhorn didn’t have the funds to pursue aviation at the


University of Illinois, but he got a three-year ROTC scholarship and graduat-


ed with an electrical engineering degree. “It saved me,” Eichhorn says.


2010


Eichhorn’s last Air Force assignment was in Albu- querque, N.M., the hot air balloon capitol of the world. “I bought my first balloon that year and started lessons.”


1977


“I entered pilot train- ing at Vance AFB, Okla., and graduated with honors and a girlfriend.” Anita became his wife, mother of their


three children, and grandmother of their five grandchildren. Next stop: “I went to Dyess AFB, Texas, where I flew B-52s [Strato- fortresses] for six years.”


1986 1985


Eichhorn graduated with honors from Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards AFB, Calif.


74 | MILITARY OFFICER | January 2018


ollow a MOAA member from the Albuquerque (N.M.)


Chapter on his flight path from high-speed bomber pilot to the leisurely pace of a hot air balloon owner and pilot. Maj. Gen. David Eichhorn, USAF (Ret), tells how it happened. — By Latayne C. Scott


2011


“[I] got my balloon license in April 2011 and bought my second balloon that we named Marauder’s Mark because we are Harry Potter fans. Our


third balloon is Mischief Managed. … I’ve flown as pilot in command in seven Albuquerque International Balloon Fiestas.”


2012 1996


“I began ballooning in Alamogordo, N.M., as a crew member, for an Air


Force colonel.”


Eichhorn became “one of the premier test pilots on the B-1B [Lancer] pro-


gram,” and then “[bounced]


around test and acquisition for the next 30 years.” He led two


squadrons, one group, one wing, and three centers.


Now


Now he regularly flies over the Rio Grande River. When he’s not aloft, he is a Federal Avi-


ation Administration-cer- tified balloon repairman.


His philosophy in the air and on the ground: “The pleasure of still serving is what it’s all about.”


PHOTOS: ABOVE AND RIGHT, COURTESY OF DAVID EICHHORN; TOP LEFT, NICK LAYMAN


Eichhorn retired from the Air Force as a major general, and the next


year, he bought a hot air balloon repair station.


NEVER STOP SERVING


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88