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ONE Action item: Ensure any TRICARE reform sus- tains access to top-quality care. Who is affected? All military beneficiaries, in- cluding active duty troops and retirees, their family members, and others entitled to DoD’s health care The issue: Reforms to the Military Health Sys- tem must sustain an operationally ready force with a ready medical force. MOAA strongly agrees the military’s health care system needs to evolve beyond what it is today into a modern, high-per- forming, integrated system. However, this interdepen- dent relationship between health care and the readi- ness-laden infrastructure must not lose sight of either imperative. The remedy: Any TRICARE reform must serve to strengthen these interdependent relation- ships while ensuring the costs of readiness are not at the expense of the beneficiary.


TWO Action item: Prevent disproportional TRICARE fee increases. Who is affected? All military beneficiaries, in- cluding active duty troops and retirees, their family members, and others entitled to DoD’s health care The issue: The health care benefit is a commit- ment our nation makes to service- members, their families, military retirees, and survi- vors for their years of service. Any re- form of TRICARE must take into account the decades of service that constitute a prepaid, in-kind premium worthy of a top-tier health benefit. Over 80 percent of those in Con-


38 | MILITARY OFFICER | January 2018


gress have not served in uniform and likely do not understand the toll service has on individu- als and military families. The remedy: Personal stories from constituents have a lot of impact on Capitol Hill. MOAA’s members, councils, and chapters are a great source of grassroots support.


THREE Action item: Sustain military pay comparability with the private sector. Who is affected? All active duty cur- rently serving uni- formed personnel and their families The issue: Budget pressures might tempt Congress to reduce military pay raises, widening the gap between military pay and civilian-sector pay and hurting recruiting and retention. The remedy: We must work to ensure annual military pay raises approved by Congress re- main tied to the Employment Cost Index.


FOUR Action item: Block erosion of compensation and non-pay and quality-of-life benefits. Who is affected? All currently serving uniformed person- nel and their family members The issue: Future proposals likely will reduce the value of compensation, to include non-pay and quality-of-life benefits such as the Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH), Special Incentive Pays, and commissary, ex- change, and morale, welfare, and recreation ben- efits, harming recruiting and retention. The remedy: MOAA will continue to oppose pro- posals to reduce the value of compensation or undermine long-term retention.


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Look for the “On Our Radar” symbol in the magazine to find updates on these key goals throughout the year.


IMAGES: CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT, CUBE29/SHUTTERSTOCK, STAFF SGT. JOSEPH YANIK, USAF; KRISTEN WONG/U.S. ARMY; PANDA VECTOR/SHUTTERSTOCK; RASHAD ASHUROV/SHUTTERSTOCK


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