search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
R&R Family. Entertainment. Travel. >>continued from page 28


EXHIBIT A new exhibit called “Visionary Veterans: Honoring Inductees Who Served in World War I” has opened at the National Inventors Hall of Fame Museum in Alexan- dria, Va. Running through Octo- ber, it features fi ve World War I veterans and National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees: Edwin Howard Armstrong, creator of FM Radio; Arnold Beckman, creator of the pH meter; Eu- gene Houdry, who discovered a method for cracking low-grade crude oil into high-test gasoline; Frederick McKinley Jones, who invented mobile refrigeration units; and Alfred Loomis, who created Long Range Navigation (LORAN), a radio navigation system for marine and fl ight nav- igators to determine a vessel’s location.


BOOK Steve Coll’s Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan (Penguin Press) resumes the narrative of his Pulitzer Prize-winning Ghost Wars. Coll tells the story of America’s intelligence, military, and diplomatic eff orts to defeat Al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan since 9/11. The book, described by Kirkus Reviews as a “journalistic masterpiece,” is scheduled for an early February release.


REEL TALK: Rob Colenso


5 Best Cult Vietnam Films I


n their latest mega-docu- mentary The Vietnam War, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick


captured the essence of the era in the series tagline: “There is no single truth in war.” Hollywood has served up


several hit fi lms that get us closer to understanding these separate and competing truths, but be- yond the usual suspects, there are some hidden gems. Here are fi ve:


THE BOYS IN COMPANY C (1978) A solid but obscure example of the from-basic-to-battle narra- tive, this was the fi rst fi lm role for R. Lee Ermey — eff ectively a warm-up for his legendary turn as the Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) drill instructor.


THE SIEGE OF FIREBASE GLORIA (1989) Two years after FMJ, Ermey returned to the screen for an- other turn as a crusty senior en- listed servicemember, this time defending a besieged fi rebase during the 1968 Tet Off ensive.


THE HANOI HILTON (1987) It fl opped in theaters, but this fi ctional portrayal of POWs in the infamous prison has a cult following among veterans. It’s a gritty look into an especially dark corner of ’Nam.


GO TELL THE SPARTANS (1978) The title is a nod to the 300 Greeks who died battling Persian


30 | MILITARY OFFICER | January 2018


DID YOU KNOW? The Boys


in Company C, directed by Sidney J. Furie, was the fi rst fi lm in the director’s Vietnam War trilogy. It was followed by Under Heavy Fire (2001) and The Veter- an (2006).


forces at Thermopylae. It stars the legendary Burt Lancaster as the commander of an Army unit facing a certain-death mission of its own.


TRIBES (1970) This made-for-TV movie tells the story of a hippie draftee (Jan Michael Vincent) and the Marine Corps drill instructor (Darren McGavin) charged with turning the pacifi st into a warrior. In teaching the private, the gunny learns lessons himself about the nature of conformity and freedom.


Rob Colenso is a pop culture en- thusiast and for- mer Marine from the Washington, D.C., area.


PHOTO: COLUMBIA PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88