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military suffering severe recruit- ing and retention cuts.” With the current NDAA calling for troop increases, MOAA will be keeping an eye on any changes to benefits proposed by DoD or Congress to ensure the transferability option remains a benefit.


SMALLER ACTIVE DUTY FORCE MEANS DEPENDENCY ON GUARD AND RESERVE Current conflicts have proven beyond any doubt the National Guard has a vital role to play in the nation’s security and war- fighting capability. With no end in sight for the Guard to support these requirements, the Army National Guard introduced a new concept called ARNG 4.0. MOAA was invited to its rollout to Congress. Here’s what you need to


know about ARNG 4.0: The Army is going to have a smaller active duty force. In fact, the active duty Army is the small- est it’s been since World War II. A large proportion of capacity for the Army will depend on the Guard and Reserve. Interopera- bility between the Guard and ac- tive duty troops is vital and must happen now. To accommodate that, the National Guard needs a new model, including a new standard of readiness. The Army calls this ARNG 4.0 because it is the fourth evolution of the Guard and means the force is ready to deploy immediately instead of after 18 months. This translates into an in-


creased number of training days for most units. Units such as the


Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy, ARNG; Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.); and Lt. Gen. Charles Luckey, USAR, brief military service organizations on ARNG 4.0. in late October.


Stryker brigade combat teams and Apache units will rotate into the Army’s National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., every four years in- stead of every five years. This is something the Guard has never done before. It also means higher train- ing standards. When asked about how this affects re- cruiting and retention statis- tics, Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy, director of the Army National Guard, noted Guard retention is at 115 percent, but new accessions might pose a prob- lem. Kadavy said the Guard has had a historic imbalance of resources between reten- tion versus recruiting. The Army National Guard


is very aware the operational tempo of its soldiers cannot be so aggressive it jeopardizes their civilian employment. The Army wants its soldiers to be “ready for war, but not so ready


18 | MILITARY OFFICER | January 2018


that they can’t keep a civilian job,” so it’s relying on military service organizations like MOAA to ensure Congress is encouraging employers to hire and retain Guard members and ensuring the Army can provide proper support to those soldiers. Some incentives include


tax credits for employers and lifting the five-year cap on the Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA). Currently, USERRA establishes a Guard or Reserve member can be absent from their civilian employment for up to five years of cumulative time and retain their position or a similar one. Beyond five years, however, their jobs are not pro- tected. MOAA has supported legislation protecting employ- ment rights of Guard and Re- serve members, as well as those that incentivize recruiting and retention, and will maintain these goals into 2018.


Contributers are Col. Dan Merry, USAF (Ret), vice president; Cmdr. René Campos, USN (Ret); Col. Mike Barron, USA (Ret); Capt. Kathy Beasley, USN (Ret); Brooke Goldberg; Lt. Col. Aniela Szymanski, USMCR; Jamie Naughton; and Forrest Allen, MOAA’s Government Relations Department; and Gina Harkins, senior staff writer. Visit www .moaa.org/ email to sign up for email updates on advocacy and other topics.


PHOTO: MOAA


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